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I have the following array pattern: 2 letters x numbers 2 letters y numbers 2 letters z numbers etc..

and I want to sort the numbers between the letters and keep the letters as is.

For example:

 a b 3 5 7 4 d c 6 3 2    

Will become

 a b 3 4 5 7 c d 2 3 6

How can I implement this in Perl?

What I tried to save the indexes of the letters by

my %index=();
my $count =0 ;
foreach (@arr ) {

if($_~=/[a-zA-Z]) {
$index{$_}=$count;
}
$count++

}

and then try to replace those sections with splice.

Also I tried the following which seems work:

my @a =qw(a b 1 3 5 3  c d 4 5 2);

my (@b,@c) =();
my $count=0;
foreach (@a) {
    if($_=~/[A-Za-z]/){
        push @b,sort @c;
        push @b,$_;
        if($count%2==0) { 
           @c=();
        }
        $count++;
    }
    else {
        push @c,$_;
    }
}

I wonder if there a more efficient and Perlish style way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried? SO is not a write-some-code-for-me site. You'll have to try for yourself and when you're stuck somewhere then state your problem here and you'll get help. –  dgw Dec 23 '13 at 23:38
    
The above what I have tried –  smith Dec 24 '13 at 0:03

2 Answers 2

One approach is to loop the array once, keeping the index of the first number encountered in a sequence. When a character is encountered (meaning the number sequence has ended), then sort the number sequence directly in that array slice

use strict;
my @arr = ('a','b',3,5,7,4,'d','c',6,3,2);

my $first = -1;
for (my $i = 0; $i < @arr; $i++) {
  if($arr[$i] =~ m/[a-z]/i) {
    next if ($first == -1);
    @arr[$first..($i-1)] = sort {$a<=>$b} @arr[$first..($i-1)];
    $first = -1;
  } elsif ($first == -1) {
    $first = $i;
  } 
}
#one last time after the loop
@arr[$first..(@arr-1)] = sort {$a<=>$b} @arr[$first..(@arr-1)] if ($first != -1);

print join(',',@arr)."\n";
share|improve this answer

Is this more satisfactory?

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @list = ('a', 'b', '3', '5', '7', '4', 'd', 'c', '6', '3', '2');

for (my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@list); $i++)
{
    if ($list[$i] =~ m/[[:alpha:]]/)
    {
        # Assume $list[$i+1] exists and is alphabetic too!
        @list[$i..$i+1] = sort @list[$i..$i+1];
        $i++;
    }
}

print "@list\n";

The concept is that when the current entry is alphabetic, the next entry must be too, so sort that slice of the array and increment $i so that the second alphabetic character is not processed separately. The sample output is:

a b 3 5 7 4 c d 6 3 2

I'm not entirely happy about the repeated slice in the line with the sort, but I'm not sure whether there's a way to avoid that while using sort.

Of course, since it is Perl, there's more than one way to do it (TMTOWTDI), so both of these also produce the correct answer. I'm not sure which is less grotesque. I'm probably missing some idiomatic way of swapping two variables.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @list = ('a', 'b', '3', '5', '7', '4', 'd', 'c', '6', '3', '2');

for (my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@list); $i++)
{
    if ($list[$i] =~ m/[[:alpha:]]/)
    {
        ($list[$i], $list[$i+1]) = ($list[$i+1], $list[$i]) if ($list[$i] gt $list[$i+1]);
        $i++;
    }
}

print "@list\n";

That swapping line is gruesome because of the three references to list elements.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @list = ('a', 'b', '3', '5', '7', '4', 'd', 'c', '6', '3', '2');

for (my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@list); $i++)
{
    if ($list[$i] =~ m/[[:alpha:]]/)
    {
        my($x,$y) = (\$list[$i], \$list[$i+1]);
        ($$x, $$y) = ($$y, $$x) if ($$x gt $$y);
        $i++;
    }
}

print "@list\n";

That swapping line is gruesome because it explicitly swaps explicit references.

share|improve this answer
    
If you were going for speed in your second version, I'm pretty sure you made it slower. Would be interesting to compare the two, ($list[$i], $list[$i+1]) = sort ($list[$i], $list[$i+1]) and my $r = sub { \@_ }->($list[$i], $list[$i+1]); @$r = sort @$r;. My bet is on the simple sort. –  ikegami Dec 24 '13 at 2:18

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