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I have a server file with a switch using the URL to display appropriate content. One of the cases is /users which should display a JSON string of a certain table. This is returned from a mysql file.

server.js

var http = require('http')
var url = require('url')
var port = 8080

function onRequest(request, response) {
    var pathname = url.parse(request.url).pathname
    console.log('Request for ' + pathname + ' received.')

    response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/html'})
    response.write(run(pathname))
    response.end()
}

function run(pathname) {
    switch(pathname) {
        case '/':
            response = 'Welcome to my little test'
            break
        case '/time':
            response = 'The time is ' + new Date().toLocaleTimeString()
            break
        case '/users':
            var response
            require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
                console.log(users)
                response = users
            })
            return response
            break
        default:
            response = 'Unable to locate the requested page'
    }
    return response
}

http.createServer(onRequest).listen(port)
console.log('Server started on port ' + port + '.')

mysql.js

var mysql = require('mysql')

var connection = mysql.createConnection({ 
    user: "root", 
    password: "password", 
    database: "main"
})

exports.getUsers = function(callback) {
    connection.query('SELECT * FROM users;', function (error, rows, fields) {
        callback(JSON.stringify(rows));
    });
};

The console.log(users) in server.js displays the JSON string fine, but I cannot figure out how to get the value out of the callback and into the response variable.

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Try and print the response after this statement: response = users. As I see it, it should work fine. The value of the callback is in the users variable and you are assigning it to the response one. I am not sure, however, if the return response statement waits for the getUsers function to finish or triggers before –  Raul Rene Dec 24 '13 at 12:29
    
It does not wait, that's the problem. I've posted an answer that hopefully will help you –  Enrique Fueyo Dec 24 '13 at 12:35
    
Or he could have just called the return statement after the console.log(users) –  Raul Rene Dec 24 '13 at 12:38
2  
@RaulRene, if he calls return after the console.log(users) that will return from the callback passed to getUsersfunction, not from runfunction –  Enrique Fueyo Dec 24 '13 at 12:54
    
You are right, sorry –  Raul Rene Dec 24 '13 at 13:03
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The way you could extract the value out of the callback is to assign that value to a variable out of the callback's scope, but I don't recommend you to do that since you would end up with lots of global variables, besides you don't know when the variable will be assigned. Try this and see what happens so you get some insight with how callbacks and node.js works:

function run(pathname) {
    switch(pathname) {
        case '/':
            response = 'Welcome to my little test'
            break
        case '/time':
            response = 'The time is ' + new Date().toLocaleTimeString()
            break
        case '/users':
            var response
            var out_of_callback_users
            require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
                out_of_callback_users = users
                console.log("In the callback")
                console.log(users)
                response = users
            })
            console.log("After require");
            console.log(out_of_callback_users) //Users have not been assigned yet
            setTimeout(function(){
              console.log("In the timeout") 
              console.log(out_of_callback_users)
            },5000) //After 5 secs the query has been completed and users have been assigned.
            return response
            break
        default:
            response = 'Unable to locate the requested page'
    }
    return response
}

The way I would go is something like this:

function onRequest(request, response) {
    var pathname = url.parse(request.url).pathname
    console.log('Request for ' + pathname + ' received.')

    response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/html'})
    run(pathname, function(response){
      response.write(response)
      response.end()
    })
}

function run(pathname,cb) {
    switch(pathname) {
        case '/':
            cb('Welcome to my little test');
            break;
        case '/time':
            cb('The time is ' + new Date().toLocaleTimeString());
            break;
        case '/users':
            require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
                console.log(users);
                cb(users);
            })
            break;
        default:
            cb('Unable to locate the requested page');
    }
    return;
}

http.createServer(onRequest).listen(port)
console.log('Server started on port ' + port + '.')
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This works perfectly! –  grit96 Dec 24 '13 at 19:03
add comment

you can't do it like this. the problem is easy. let's talk about it: function getUsers is an asynchronous. so the code follow runs like this:

 case '/users':
   var response
   require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
     console.log(users)
     response = users
   })
   return response
   break

first, run require('./mysql').getUser() , then it will do return response directly, then break . when the getUser function is finished, it will run

 function(users) {
     console.log(users)
     response = users
   })

so, a rule you need to follow: once you use asynchronous, the other function have to be asynchronous. i wonder you can modify like follow:

function onRequest(request, response) {
  var pathname = url.parse(request.url).pathname
  console.log('Request for ' + pathname + ' received.')

  response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/html'})
  run(pathname, function(res){ response.write(res)})  //changed
  response.end()
}

function run(pathname, callback) {
  switch(pathname) {
      case '/':
        callback('Welcome to my little test')
        break
      case '/time':
        callback('The time is ' + new Date().toLocaleTimeString())
        break
      case '/users':
        var response
        require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
            console.log(users)
            callback(users) # changed
        })
        break
      default:
        callback('Unable to locate the requested page')
  }
}

http.createServer(onRequest).listen(port)
console.log('Server started on port ' + port + '.')
share|improve this answer
add comment

You do not need to serialize the mysql returned rows to use it. Either you can process it within getUsers, or return it back to the controller. If you return it, change code to:

exports.getUsers = function(callback) {
    connection.query('SELECT * FROM users;', function (error, rows, fields) {
        callback(rows);
    });
};

Now within the server.js file, you can process the returned rows, like:

case '/users':
  var response = ''
  require('./mysql').getUsers(function(users) {
    for (var i in users) {
      var user = users[i];
      var userId = user.id;
      var userName = user.user_name;
      response += "User - ID: "+userId+" Name: "+userName+"\n";
    }
  })
  return response;
break;

You can process

share|improve this answer
    
This does not attempt to fix the original problem. –  grit96 Dec 24 '13 at 19:04
1  
sorry for misinterpretation, I was just trying to help. I am glad you have a fix now. –  Nitin... Dec 24 '13 at 20:34
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