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this is my C code:

int main()
{
    void * ptr_void;
    void ** ptr_2void;
    ptr_void = ptr_2void;
    return 0;
}

i am just wondering why this code is valid? i have assigned an (void *) to (void **), the compiler pass it even without a warning. the type looks mismatch. and the following code that assigning an (void **) to (int *) also works.

int main()
{
    int * ptr_int;
    void ** ptr_2void;
    ptr_int = ptr_2void;
    return 0;
}

anyone is able to figure out what is exactly of (void *) stuff?

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6  
Any data pointer type can be cast to/from void*. –  Barmar Dec 24 '13 at 15:31
1  
@Barmar: "Cast"? The question has absolutely nothing to do with any casts at all. The question is about implicit conversions. And no, not any data pointer type can be implicitly converted to/from void *. CV-qualifications are still enforced in such cases. –  AnT Dec 25 '13 at 1:34
    
` i have assigned an (void *) to (void **) ` should be ` i have assigned an (void **) to (void *) ` –  nishantjr Dec 25 '13 at 4:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

void pointers are type converted to pointers to any other data type implicitly. The compiler will not show any warning. Similarly type converting from pointer of any type to void * will also work without a warning.

Other than for void pointers, if you try to convert from one pointer type to another pointer type implicitly a warning will be issued by the compiler.

For example consider the code given below, It will give you the warning "assignment from incompatible pointer type".

  int *intptr;
  void *voidptr;
  void **vvptr;
  int intval=123;
  voidptr=&intval;
  vvptr=voidptr;
  intptr=vvptr; 

The line of code causing the warning is intptr=vvptr; because intptr is an integer pointer and vvptr is a pointer of type void **. None of them are void * pointers and thus a warning.

In order to avoid this warning, you have to explicitly type cast the void ** type to int * type. If you change the line intptr=vvptr; to intptr=(int *)vvptr; then the warning will not be shown by the compiler.

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thanks all guys. totally make sense of it. –  kevin Dec 24 '13 at 15:48
4  
I think you are confusing cast and conversion. And the last sentence is plain wrong (for all compilers I have ever seen). –  undur_gongor Dec 24 '13 at 19:58
    
Er... That would be rather illogical to see void * converted to any other type without warnings, yet int * be converted to void * with a warning. Which compiler behaves that way? Normally in C language pointer conversions to and from void * are performed without any warnings. Additionally, the question has nothing to do with "typecasting". –  AnT Dec 25 '13 at 1:32
    
@AndreyT: Perhaps there's some confusion with C++ here? –  Keith Thompson Dec 25 '13 at 3:00
    
@Keith Thompson: Could be, but even in C++ implicit conversions to void * are allowed and performed quietly. –  AnT Dec 25 '13 at 3:15

It's important to distinguish between a conversion and a cast.

A conversion transforms a value of one type to a value of another type. A cast is an operator (consisting of a type name in parentheses) that explicitly specifies a conversion. A conversion may be either explicit (specified by a cast operator) or implicit. Most pointer conversions require a cast operator; pointer conversions involving void* are the exception to this.

A value of any pointer-to-object type (or pointer-to-incomplete type) may be converted to void* and back to its original type; the resulting pointer is guaranteed to compare equal to the original pointer.

In an assignment (or when passing an argument to a function, or in a return statement), a conversion to or from void* may be done implicitly, with no cast operator.

In your first code sample:

void * ptr_void;
void ** ptr_2void;
ptr_void = ptr_2void;

the assignment is permitted because a void** may be converted to a void* without a cast. There's nothing special about void** here; a pointer to anything may be converted to a void* without a cast. (void* is a generic pointer type; void** is not a generic pointer-to-pointer type, and in fact there is no generic pointer-to-pointer type.)

In your second code sample:

int * ptr_int;
void ** ptr_2void;
ptr_int = ptr_2void;

the assignment is not valid; it's a constraint violation. There is no implicit conversion between int* and void**, since neither type is void*. Any conforming C compiler must issue a diagnostic message for the assignment. In some cases, the diagnostic may be a warning, and the compiler will probably generate an implicit conversion as if you had written a cast. In other cases, a compiler may require additional options to cause it to diagnose this violation.

Note that the above does not apply to function pointers. Any function pointer type may be converted (with a cast) to any other function pointer type, converting a function pointer to void* or vice versa has undefined behavior (though it may be supported by some compilers).

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The business with function pointers probably relates to when you've got a partitioned memory model or one of the funky ones that used to abound back in DOS days; the pointers may point to wildly different pieces of memory even when they have the same bit pattern (thanks, Intel segment registers!) or they may be of different widths. Now, off to get some eggnog to help me forget these things once more! –  Donal Fellows Dec 25 '13 at 7:51

void** and void* are different types. int* and void** are different types too. But as Barmar says, any data pointer type can be cast to/from void*. That means you can cast int* to void*, but you cannot cast int* to void**, as void** does not have this same special property.

gcc should give a warning:

warning: assignment from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]

     ptr_int = ptr_2void;

See this question: Passing to void** instead void* makes the compiler complain about types, why?

void * is a type that is implicitly convertible to and from any object pointer type. void ** isn't - so while you can assign a char * to a void , you can not do the same with char * and void **.

The reason is that they are incompatible types: char ** points to a char , void * points to a void *, so their base types don't match.

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