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I am trying to grasp the concept of delegate and I grabbed the following code from a SO post. What I am not understanding is what is happening inside of Main method. I can tell from a surfacial look at it there is a new delegate object and methods with matching arguments and return types are being called by referencing the delegate object. I want to know what these three lines are doing specifically:

Valid v1 = new Valid(Test.checkInt);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMax);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMin);

Here is the actual code:

using System;

public delegate void Valid(int a);

public class Test {
    public const int MAX_VALUE = 255;
    public const int MIN_VALUE = 10;

    public static void checkInt(int a) {
        Console.Write("checkInt result of {0}: ", a);
        if (a < MAX_VALUE && a > MIN_VALUE)
            Console.WriteLine("max and min value is valid");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("max and min value is not valid");
    }

    public static void checkMax(int a) {
        Console.Write("checkMax result of {0}: ", a);
        if (a < MAX_VALUE)
            Console.WriteLine("max value is valid");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("max value is not valid");
    }

    public static void checkMin(int a) {
        Console.Write("checkMin result of {0}: ", a);
        if (a > MIN_VALUE)
            Console.WriteLine("min value is valid");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("min value is not valid");
        Console.WriteLine("");
    }
}

public class Driver {
    public static void Main(string [] args) {
        Valid v1 = new Valid(Test.checkInt);
        v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMax);
        v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMin);
        v1(1);
        v1(10);
        v1(20);
        v1(30);
        v1(254);
        v1(255);
        v1(256);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Valid v1 = new Valid(Test.checkInt);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMax);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMin);

The first line declares a new delegate v1 (analogous to a function pointer). For now, its pointing to Test.checkInt.

Then with the += operator you make the delegate point to a second method, promoting it to a MulticastDelegate. The same thing happens on the third line.

On the following lines you invoke the delegate, which in turn invokes all methods that it is pointing to. The parameters passed to the delegate, will be passed to each of these methods.

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Valid v1 = new Valid(Test.checkInt);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMax);
v1 += new Valid(Test.checkMin);

That code sets up a Multi-Cast Delegate. It means that, when you execute v1 with a parameter (which is what's happening in the Main method), it will pass that parameter to all three check methods and execute them in sequence. The method parameter is specified in the delegate declaration.

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The three lines in question define delegates conforming to the signature of Valid, using methods with the corresponding return type and parameters. The += operator makes a so-called multicast delegate from regular delegates. When a multicast delegate is called, its implementation calls the component delegates, producing the effects that you see.

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The += operator for delegates is a way to combine delegates. It will create a new delegate that, when called, will invoke all of the methods that the delegate would have invoked before, in addition to this new method.

In this case, after executing those lines of code, invoking v1 will execute Test.checkInt, Test.checkMax, and Test.checkMin.

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