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I'm trying to create a collection that acts just like all other collections, except when you read out of it, it can be filtered by setting a flag.

Consider this (admittedly contrived) example:

var list = new FilteredStringList() {
    "Annie",
    "Amy",
    "Angela",
    "Mary"
};
list.Filter = true;

I added four items, but then I set the "Filter" flag, so that whenever I read anything out of it (or do anything that involves reading out of it), I want to filter the list to items that begin with "A".

Here's my class:

public class FilteredStringList : Collection<string>
{
    public bool Filter { get; set; }

    protected new IList<string> Items
    {
        get
        {
            if(Filter)
            {
                return base.Items.Where(i => i.StartsWith("A")).ToList();
            }
            return base.Items;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach(var item in Items)
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}

My theory is that I'm overriding and filtering the Items property from the base Collection object. I assumed that all other methods would read from this collection.

If I iterate via ForEach, I get:

Annie
Amy
Angela

Yay! But, if I do this:

list.Count()

I get "4". So, Count() is not respecting my filter.

And if I do this:

list.Where(i => i[1] == 'a')

I still get "Mary" back, even though she shouldn't be there.

I know I can override all sorts of the Collection methods, but I don't really want to override them all. Additionally, I want all the LINQ methods to respect my filter.

share|improve this question
    
Why shouldn't such a filtered collection just not add the item, instead of adding it and not showing it when iterating? Are there situations in which you want to access items that were added that don't pass the filter? –  Servy Dec 24 '13 at 19:32
2  
Is there some reason that using .Where(i => i.StartsWith("A")) is insufficient? –  rossipedia Dec 24 '13 at 19:33
    
Because I want to be able to set a property on collection and bypass the filter, if necessary (not shown). –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 19:33
2  
As a side note, I dislike the concept of extending Collection when making your own collection. If you want to make your own collection and have it be usable, you almost always want to be writing it from scratch. Implement whatever interfaces from the Collections namespace you need to allow it to be used. –  Servy Dec 24 '13 at 19:34
    
I clarified the example. –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 19:43
show 2 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like your concept is to have one list that can be represented in two different ways. That's really two lists, and I would suggest running it as two lists. Furthering your contrived example:

// the base list containing all items
var list = new List<string>
{
    "Annie", "Amy", "Angela", "Mary"
};

Then, create an expression of that list that only is your filtered items:

 // do NOT .ToList() this list:
 var filteredList = list.Where (x => x.StartsWith("A"));

You can continue to add/remove items from list and filteredList will always contain the updated values when you access it.

And if you really must access only a single field/property then you could put list and filteredList into a class that also includes an IsFiltered property that is used to determine which of those two lists to return.

What you would be doing is creating a class that returns to you the proper list. Something like:

public class Filtered<T>
{
    private IEnumerable<T> _list;
    private IEnumerable<T> _filteredList;

    public bool IsFiltered { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<T> MyCollection { get { return IsFiltered ? _filteredList 
                                                                 : _list; }}

    public Filtered(IEnumerable<T> list, IEnumerable<T> filteredList)
    {
        _list = list;
        _filteredList = filteredList;
    }
}

Instead of binding to list like your original example, you're binding to the above class's MyCollection property (filtered.MyCollection);

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I ended up doing. Implementing ICollection was less painful that all the other alternatives. –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 20:19
    
@Deane, though this is a much better solution than mine, I wonder if my solution would also work. It also addresses the issue where Count kept returning 4. It's because the underlying base.Items was not modified. –  ChrisLava Dec 24 '13 at 20:28
    
If IsFiltered is set to false, shouldn't MyCollection return both _list and _filteredList? so you'll need to _list.Concat(_filteredList)? –  Ray Cheng Dec 24 '13 at 20:45
    
@Deane, I suggest Servy's answer. All other answers seem to have some kind of shortcomings. –  Ray Cheng Dec 24 '13 at 20:56
    
@RayCheng, No, about needing .Concat since list contains all the items and filteredList returns a subset of list. –  Brad Rem Dec 25 '13 at 2:32
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Don't inherit from Collection. Instead just inherit directly from Object, have the method implement whatever interfaces are needed (IList, probably), create an internal List instance to be the backing collection, and then expose each operation as you would like it to be seen.

public class FilteredCollection : IList<string>, IEnumerable<string>
{
    private List<string> list = new List<string>();
    public bool Filter { get; set; }

    protected IList<string> Items
    {
        get
        {
            if (Filter)
            {
                return list.Where(i => i.StartsWith("A")).ToList();
            }
            return list;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return Items.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public int IndexOf(string item)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Insert(int index, string item)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public string this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
        set
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    //continue with the rest
}

There are several advantages here.

  1. It's clear to you what each method is doing. You don't need to worry about having methods left with defaults that aren't sensible. The fact that only a handful of operations are likely to literally just calling the same method of the List is a motivating factor here. To truly represent a filtered list just about every single operation likely should change, so it's not like you're adding a bunch of work for yourself.

  2. The methods of Collection aren't virtual, they're sealed, this means that having the class typed as the base class will result in the base class methods being used. This means a caller can bypass the filters you're adding when you think that they're enabled. That sounds like a really bad idea.

My theory is that I'm overriding and filtering the Items property from the base Collection object. I assumed that all other methods would read from this collection.

But you're not overriding Items, you're hiding it. You even needed to call out the fact that you're not overriding it by using the new keyword instead of the override keyword. You couldn't use the override keyword even if you wanted to because all of the methods/properties in Collection are sealed, not virtual. It was designed specifically to prevent you from doing what you're trying to do. (Which is why I generally see little use for it as a class in general.)

I know I can override all sorts of the Collection methods, but I don't really want to override them all.

Well, technically, the only virtual methods that you have to override are ClearItems, InsertItem, RemoveItem, and SetItem (along with Equals, GetHashCode, and ToString from Object). The rest of the methods/properties aren't virtual, and so cannot be overridden. The only real effective solution is to write them all out.

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add comment

Why not just use the plain old List and apply Where clause when needed?

var list = new List<string>() {
    "Annie",
    "Amy",
    "Angela",
    "Mary"
};

list.Where(o=>o.StartsWith("A")).Count();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe override the Add method instead? That way you'll cover all bases.

public class FilteredStringList : Collection<string>
{
    public new void Add(string item)
    {
        if (item.StartsWith("A", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
            base.Add(item);
    }
}

My theory is that I'm overriding and filtering the Items property from the base Collection object. I assumed that all other methods would read from this collection.

Note that this is a misconception of how hiding with the new modifier works. When you hide a property using protected new IList<string> Items, it doesn't mean the base Items property is now virtual. References to FilteredStringList will use the new method, but references to Collection<string> (including all methods in the base class) will continue to use the "hidden" base method.

Edit per comment

To have a collection that can switch the filter on/off, consider implementing one of the interfaces like ICollection<T>. That way you can apply whatever filtering logic you like (ie, filter on add, filter on retrieve, etc). For example, if the Filter should apply on write, then you'd implement a custom Add, while the GetEnumerator methods would just be a pass-through. If the Filter should apply on read, then vice versa: Add would be a pass-through, and the enumerator methods would implement the filter:

public class FilteredStringList<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private Collection<T> _internalCollection = new Collection<T>();
    public bool IsFilterActive { get; set; }
    public Predicate<T> Filter { get; set; }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        _internalCollection.Add(item);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        _internalCollection.Clear();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return _internalCollection.Where(item => !IsFilterActive || Filter(item)).Count(); }
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach (var item in _internalCollection)
        {
            if (!IsFilterActive || Filter(item))
                yield return item;
        }
    }

    // TODO implement other pass-through ICollection<T> methods
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not an option –  Servy Dec 24 '13 at 19:34
    
I still want all the objects "in the background," because I want to be able to allowed to set a property to bypass the filter. –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 19:34
    
I clarified the example. –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 19:44
    
Regarding your edit: the filtering cannot be on Add, because all the items have to be in there. The filter needs to happen on any Read operation -- foreach, Count(), Where(), etc. –  Deane Dec 24 '13 at 19:52
    
@Deane updated above to account for the read case. It's not that much work to adjust the methods to account for the filter. –  McGarnagle Dec 24 '13 at 20:04
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