Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a wstring to file with ofstream in binary mode, but I think I'm doing something wrong. This is what I've tried:

ofstream outFile("test.txt", std::ios::out | std::ios::binary);
wstring hello = L"hello";
outFile.write((char *) hello.c_str(), hello.length() * sizeof(wchar_t));
outFile.close();

Opening test.txt in for example Firefox with encoding set to UTF16 it will show as:

h�e�l�l�o�

Could anyone tell me why this happens?

EDIT:

Opening the file in a hex editor I get:

FF FE 68 00 00 00 65 00 00 00 6C 00 00 00 6C 00 00 00 6F 00 00 00

Looks like I get two extra bytes in between every character for some reason?

share|improve this question
    
Add a facet to the local associated with the stream to do the conversion from wchar_t to the correct output. See below. –  Loki Astari Oct 16 '08 at 13:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suspect that sizeof(wchar_t) is 4 in your environment - i.e. it's writing out UTF-32/UCS-4 instead of UTF-16. That's certainly what the hex dump looks like.

That's easy enough to test (just print out sizeof(wchar_t)) but I'm pretty sure it's what's going on.

To go from a UTF-32 wstring to UTF-16 you'll need to apply a proper encoding, as surrogate pairs come into play.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, you are correct wchar_t is of size 4, I'm in a mac. So that explains a lot :) I'm aware of the surrogate pairs in UTF-16, will have to look into that a bit more. –  Cactuar Oct 16 '08 at 8:01
    
From the output you can not tell it it is UTF-16 or UTF-32 all it shows is that wchar_t is 4 bytes wide. The encoding of the string is not defined by the language (though it is most likely to be UCS-4). –  Loki Astari Oct 16 '08 at 13:10

Here we run into the little used locale properties. If you output your string as a string (rather than raw data) you can get the locale to do the appropriate conversion auto-magically.

N.B.This code does not take into account edianness of the wchar_t character.

#include <locale>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
// See Below for the facet
#include "UTF16Facet.h"

int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
   // construct a custom unicode facet and add it to a local.
   UTF16Facet *unicodeFacet = new UTF16Facet();
   const std::locale unicodeLocale(std::cout.getloc(), unicodeFacet);

   // Create a stream and imbue it with the facet
   std::wofstream   saveFile;
   saveFile.imbue(unicodeLocale);


   // Now the stream is imbued we can open it.
   // NB If you open the file stream first. Any attempt to imbue it with a local will silently fail.
   saveFile.open("output.uni");
   saveFile << L"This is my Data\n";


   return(0);
}

The File: UTF16Facet.h

 #include <locale>

class UTF16Facet: public std::codecvt<wchar_t,char,std::char_traits<wchar_t>::state_type>
{
   typedef std::codecvt<wchar_t,char,std::char_traits<wchar_t>::state_type> MyType;
   typedef MyType::state_type          state_type;
   typedef MyType::result              result;


   /* This function deals with converting data from the input stream into the internal stream.*/
   /*
    * from, from_end:  Points to the beginning and end of the input that we are converting 'from'.
    * to,   to_limit:  Points to where we are writing the conversion 'to'
    * from_next:       When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to read from. (ie the first unconverted input character)
    * to_next:         When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to write to.
    *
    * status:          This indicates the status of the conversion.
    *                  possible values are:
    *                  error:      An error occurred the bad file bit will be set.
    *                  ok:         Everything went to plan
    *                  partial:    Not enough input data was supplied to complete any conversion.
    *                  nonconv:    no conversion was done.
    */
   virtual result  do_in(state_type &s,
                           const char  *from,const char *from_end,const char* &from_next,
                           wchar_t     *to,  wchar_t    *to_limit,wchar_t*    &to_next) const
   {
       // Loop over both the input and output array/
       for(;(from < from_end) && (to < to_limit);from += 2,++to)
       {
           /*Input the Data*/
           /* As the input 16 bits may not fill the wchar_t object
            * Initialise it so that zero out all its bit's. This
            * is important on systems with 32bit wchar_t objects.
            */
           (*to)                               = L'\0';

           /* Next read the data from the input stream into
            * wchar_t object. Remember that we need to copy
            * into the bottom 16 bits no matter what size the
            * the wchar_t object is.
            */
           reinterpret_cast<char*>(to)[0]  = from[0];
           reinterpret_cast<char*>(to)[1]  = from[1];
       }
       from_next   = from;
       to_next     = to;

       return((from > from_end)?partial:ok);
   }



   /* This function deals with converting data from the internal stream to a C/C++ file stream.*/
   /*
    * from, from_end:  Points to the beginning and end of the input that we are converting 'from'.
    * to,   to_limit:  Points to where we are writing the conversion 'to'
    * from_next:       When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to read from. (ie the first unconverted input character)
    * to_next:         When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to write to.
    *
    * status:          This indicates the status of the conversion.
    *                  possible values are:
    *                  error:      An error occurred the bad file bit will be set.
    *                  ok:         Everything went to plan
    *                  partial:    Not enough input data was supplied to complete any conversion.
    *                  nonconv:    no conversion was done.
    */
   virtual result do_out(state_type &state,
                           const wchar_t *from, const wchar_t *from_end, const wchar_t* &from_next,
                           char          *to,   char          *to_limit, char*          &to_next) const
   {
       for(;(from < from_end) && (to < to_limit);++from,to += 2)
       {
           /* Output the Data */
           /* NB I am assuming the characters are encoded as UTF-16.
            * This means they are 16 bits inside a wchar_t object.
            * As the size of wchar_t varies between platforms I need
            * to take this into consideration and only take the bottom
            * 16 bits of each wchar_t object.
            */
           to[0]     = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(from)[0];
           to[1]     = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(from)[1];

       }
       from_next   = from;
       to_next     = to;

       return((to > to_limit)?partial:ok);
   }
};
share|improve this answer

It is easy if you use the C++11 standard (because there are a lot of additional includes like "utf8" which solves this problems forever).

But if you want to use multi-platform code with older standards, you can use this method to write with streams:

  1. Read the article about UTF converter for streams
  2. Add stxutif.h to your project from sources above
  3. Open the file in ANSI mode and add the BOM to the start of a file, like this:

    std::ofstream fs;
    fs.open(filepath, std::ios::out|std::ios::binary);
    
    unsigned char smarker[3];
    smarker[0] = 0xEF;
    smarker[1] = 0xBB;
    smarker[2] = 0xBF;
    
    fs << smarker;
    fs.close();
    
  4. Then open the file as UTF and write your content there:

    std::wofstream fs;
    fs.open(filepath, std::ios::out|std::ios::app);
    
    std::locale utf8_locale(std::locale(), new utf8cvt<false>);
    fs.imbue(utf8_locale); 
    
    fs << .. // Write anything you want...
    
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the reference and clear explanation :) –  Anne Sep 20 '12 at 8:08

On windows using wofstream and the utf16 facet defined above fails becuase the wofstream converts all bytes with the value 0A to 2 bytes 0D 0A, this is irrespective of how you pass the 0A byte in, '\x0A', L'\x0A', L'\x000A', '\n', L'\n' and std::endl all give the same result. On windows you have to open the file with an ofstream (not a wofsteam) in binary mode and write the output just like it is done in the original post.

share|improve this answer

The provided Utf16Facet didn't work in gcc for big strings, here is the version that worked for me... This way the file will be saved in UTF-16LE. For UTF-16BE, simply invert the assignments in do_in and do_out, e.g. to[0] = from[1] and to[1] = from[0]

#include <locale>
#include <bits/codecvt.h>


class UTF16Facet: public std::codecvt<wchar_t,char,std::char_traits<wchar_t>::state_type>
{
   typedef std::codecvt<wchar_t,char,std::char_traits<wchar_t>::state_type> MyType;
   typedef MyType::state_type          state_type;
   typedef MyType::result              result;


   /* This function deals with converting data from the input stream into the internal stream.*/
   /*
    * from, from_end:  Points to the beginning and end of the input that we are converting 'from'.
    * to,   to_limit:  Points to where we are writing the conversion 'to'
    * from_next:       When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to read from. (ie the first unconverted input character)
    * to_next:         When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to write to.
    *
    * status:          This indicates the status of the conversion.
    *                  possible values are:
    *                  error:      An error occurred the bad file bit will be set.
    *                  ok:         Everything went to plan
    *                  partial:    Not enough input data was supplied to complete any conversion.
    *                  nonconv:    no conversion was done.
    */
   virtual result  do_in(state_type &s,
                           const char  *from,const char *from_end,const char* &from_next,
                           wchar_t     *to,  wchar_t    *to_limit,wchar_t*    &to_next) const
   {

       for(;from < from_end;from += 2,++to)
       {
           if(to<=to_limit){
               (*to)                               = L'\0';

               reinterpret_cast<char*>(to)[0]  = from[0];
               reinterpret_cast<char*>(to)[1]  = from[1];

               from_next   = from;
               to_next     = to;
           }
       }

       return((to != to_limit)?partial:ok);
   }



   /* This function deals with converting data from the internal stream to a C/C++ file stream.*/
   /*
    * from, from_end:  Points to the beginning and end of the input that we are converting 'from'.
    * to,   to_limit:  Points to where we are writing the conversion 'to'
    * from_next:       When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to read from. (ie the first unconverted input character)
    * to_next:         When the function exits this should have been updated to point at the next location
    *                  to write to.
    *
    * status:          This indicates the status of the conversion.
    *                  possible values are:
    *                  error:      An error occurred the bad file bit will be set.
    *                  ok:         Everything went to plan
    *                  partial:    Not enough input data was supplied to complete any conversion.
    *                  nonconv:    no conversion was done.
    */
   virtual result do_out(state_type &state,
                           const wchar_t *from, const wchar_t *from_end, const wchar_t* &from_next,
                           char          *to,   char          *to_limit, char*          &to_next) const
   {

       for(;(from < from_end);++from, to += 2)
       {
           if(to <= to_limit){

               to[0]     = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(from)[0];
               to[1]     = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(from)[1];

               from_next   = from;
               to_next     = to;
           }
       }

       return((to != to_limit)?partial:ok);
   }
};
share|improve this answer

You should look at the output file in a hex editor such as WinHex so you can see the actual bits and bytes, to verify that the output is actually UTF-16. Post it here and let us know the result. That will tell us whether to blame Firefox or your C++ program.

But it looks to me like your C++ program works and Firefox is not interpreting your UTF-16 correctly. UTF-16 calls for two bytes for every character. But Firefox is printing twice as many characters as it should, so it is probably trying to interpret your string as UTF-8 or ASCII, which generally just have 1 byte per character.

When you say "Firefox with encoding set to UTF16" what do you mean? I'm skeptical that that work work.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.