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I am creating an ObservableCollection of ViewModel objects, where each object has several tasks to complete when it gets initialized.

I'm adding these to an ObservableCollection like this in the parent viewmodel:

public async void ButtonPressCommandHandler() 
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 25; ++i)
    {
        var testViewModel = new TestViewModel();
        await testViewModel.Initialize();
        TestViewModels.Add(testViewModel);
    }
}

That loop just gets called on a button click or some other event.

And here's the test viewmodel code:

public class TestViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private string _taskOne;
    public string TaskOne
    {
        [DebuggerStepThrough]
        get { return _taskOne; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _taskOne)
            {
                _taskOne = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged(() => TaskOne);
            }
        }
    }

    private string _taskTwo;
    public string TaskTwo
    {
        [DebuggerStepThrough]
        get { return _taskTwo; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _taskTwo)
            {
                _taskTwo = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged(() => TaskTwo);
            }
        }
    }

    public async Task Initialize()
    {
        TaskOne = await TaskOneAsync();
        TaskTwo = await TaskTwoAsync();
    }

    private Task<string> TaskOneAsync()
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100);
            return "Task one";
        });
    }

    private Task<string> TaskTwoAsync()
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
        var random = new Random();
        int randomNumber = random.Next(500, 5000);
        Thread.Sleep(randomNumber);
        return "Task two: " + randomNumber;
            Thread.Sleep(randomNumber);
            return "Task two: " + randomNumber;
        });
    }
}

(I know I can call the init work in the constructor, but this is closer to what I really need to do.)

In my view, I have a ListView where the ListView.ItemTemplate just displays text blocks with the TaskOne and TaskTwo properties. It's ItemSource is bound to TestViewModels.

What I see is that for each of the 25 objects created, TaskOne and TaskTwo properties both appear at the same time, and each object shows only after both tasks have completed.

If I remove the await from Initialize() and have Initialize() return void (this IS on the UI thread) the behavior is better- I see all TaskOne properties very quickly, and then the TaskTwo properties start to fill in. But the random values they display are wrong- there are many duplicates and they appear to fill in the list in chunks or 4 or 5 (kind of hard to say).

The whole goal of this in non-test code is to update a progress indicator tied to TaskTwo. Something like this (from the TestViewModel code):

public async Task Initialize()
{
    TaskOne = await TaskOneAsync();
    Loading = true;
    TaskTwo = await TaskTwoAsync();
    Loading = false;
}

Where all the objects load immediately into the list, and then asynchronously update their TaskOne and TaskTwo properties as they complete, and update the progress indicator based off of the work in TaskTwo. But so far no luck in getting this to work.

EDIT: Added better example code and explanations

share|improve this question
    
1. Does your ViewModel implements INotifyPropertyChanged? 2. You're aware that you fire an async task and never awaits the resulted Task? –  i3arnon Dec 24 '13 at 22:32
    
2*. In second glance i see you're using async void which is highly recommended against (unless it's a UI Event Handler) –  i3arnon Dec 24 '13 at 22:42
    
Could you post a short, but complete code that demonstrates the issue? It's hard to see what's going on from just those few snippets. –  svick Dec 25 '13 at 12:46
    
@I3arnon I know the async void is bad.. but for some reason I don't get it gives me results closer to what I want. I'm updating my question with better code examples as well. –  Nicros Dec 26 '13 at 19:22
    
It's ok in a UI thread because of the synchronization context. –  i3arnon Dec 27 '13 at 5:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, the way the code is written the result should definitely be as you described.

What I see is that for each of the 25 objects created, TaskOne and TaskTwo properties both appear at the same time, and e sadfach object shows only after both tasks have completed.

The line await testViewModel.Initialize(); awaits the Initialize method which in turns awaits the two tasks. That means that you add the item (TestViewModels.Add(testViewModel);) only after both tasks have already finished.

Second, if you do not await the Initialize you may call it again before the previous run has finished, which means that you run the 2 tasks in parallel (using StartNew). That will result in several Random instances being created pretty close to one another. The Random class uses a time based seed to generates values and in that case the seed will be the same, hence same "random" results. From the Random MSDN article:

The default seed value is derived from the system clock and has finite resolution. As a result, different Random objects that are created in close succession by a call to the default constructor will have identical default seed values and, therefore, will produce identical sets of random numbers. This problem can be avoided by using a single Random object to generate all random numbers. You can also work around it by modifying the seed value returned by the system clock and then explicitly providing this new seed value to the Random(Int32) constructor

Lastly, I would discourage using both Task.Factory.StartNew and Thread.Sleep in an async-await environment. You probably should be using Task.Run and await Task.Delay instead (I get that it's a sample code though).

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting... this makes sense- I suspected there was something weird with the Random generation but wasn't sure if that was a separate problem... cheers! –  Nicros Dec 27 '13 at 19:12

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