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Can someone explain to me what is happening in the below code?

function foo() {
    var x = [-1, 2, 1];
    setTimeout(function () {
        console.log(x);    
    }, 3000);
    return x;
}
var z = foo()
z[1] = 0;
console.log(z);

// result: [-1, 0, 1] and after 3 seconds [-1, 0, 1]. 

I was expecting to get [-1, 2, 1] for the second output due to closure. But I'm not. Is it because x outlived the foo() and I was able to change it using z[1] = 0 ? please explain.

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z and x point to the same array object. –  Blender Dec 25 '13 at 0:59
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4 Answers

When a function returns an array or an object, it actually returns an reference to it, not a copy as what would happen with primitive values. If x were a number, string or boolean value, for example, the changes you made outside the function would not have effect inside it.

If you want to return a copy of your array to get the expected behavior, you can use the slice method.

function foo() {
    var x = [-1, 2, 1];
    setTimeout(function () {
        console.log(x);    
    }, 3000);
    return x.slice();
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/KbxMX/1/

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When you return x you're passing a reference to the place in memory where [-1, 2, 1] is stored. This means x and z are the same Object, z is not a clone, and any changes made to one are seen in the other, as they're just alias' for the same thing.

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Is it because x outlived the foo() and I was able to change it using z[1] = 0?

x outlives foo’s body in two ways:

  1. As a closure in setTimeout’s callback
  2. As a returned value

x in the body, the returned value and the closed value all still refer to the same array.

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Variables and objects are different; objects are values while variables name (or "reference") objects1.

The Array object created with [-1, 2, 1] is accessible via the variable binding x in the callback. However, the same Array object, which was also returned and assigned to z, was mutated in the caller before the callback ran: both x and z name the same object.

There is only one Array object in the given code (created by [-1, 2, 1]): objects (independent of variables) are never copied, cloned, or duplicated implicitly. (If a duplicate is required, it must be created accordingly.)


1 It would be more appropriate to say "..variables name values". However, in this case, the specific value in question is that of an array (a true object in JavaScript) and not a primitive value like a number or undefined.

I use "reference" in quotes because the behavior can be explained without introducing the term which contains baggage from other languages and contexts. The ECMAScript specification does not use "reference" to discuss the association between variable and objects. Instead, ES5 uses the internal function PutValue (in conjunction with Simple Assignment, etc) to describe the operation of "binding a value to a variable".

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