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While I practicing my self to study function pointers, there's error occurred like this

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "_comp_employee", referenced from:
      _main in main-JEO5Je.o
  "_init_database", referenced from:
      _main in main-JEO5Je.o
  "_print_database", referenced from:
      _main in main-JEO5Je.o
  "_sort", referenced from:
      _main in main-JEO5Je.o
  "_swap_employee", referenced from:
      _main in main-JEO5Je.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64

And I can not get it why it was happened. I think all of this source(below) are correct.

Here is my code. employee.h defines Employee's information and define databases and functions.

  1 /* file employee.h */
  2 
  3 #ifndef employee_h
  4 #define employee_h
  5 
  6 typedef struct emp_struct {
  7     char name[100];
  8     int employee_no;
  9     float salary, tax_to_date;
 10 } Employee;
 11 
 12 typedef Employee *Database[10];
 13 
 14 int comp_employee (int *database[], int i, int j);
 15 void swap_employee (int *data[], int i, int j);
 16 
 17 /* read in database (for this exercise fake it) */
 18 void init_database( Database employees, int no_employees );
 19 
 20 /* print out the database */
 21 void print_database ( Database people, int no_employees);
 22 
 23 #endif /* employee_h */ 

Sort.h file is define function pointers

  1 /* file sort.h */
  2 
  3 #ifndef sort_h
  4 #define sort_h
  5 typedef int (*comp_ptr) (int *data[], int s, int t);
  6 typedef void(*swap_ptr) (int *data[], int s, int t);
  7 
  8 void sort (int *data[], int n, comp_ptr compare, swap_ptr swap);
  9 
 10 #endif /* sort.h */

Finally, main.c combines all of its header to the program.

  1 #include "sort.h"
  2 #include "employee.h"
  3 
  4 int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  5     const int no_employees = 10;
  6     Database people;
  7     init_database (people, no_employees);
  8     print_database(people, no_employees);
  9     sort((int**)people, no_employees, comp_employee, swap_employee);
 10     print_database(people, no_employees);
 11     return 0;
 12 }

First, I thought my compiler confusing between <sort.h> and "sort.h", which is I defined. But after changed header name it also throws out same errors. Will you give me some advice and tips of function pointer for me?

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a linker error. You must not have added the object file of those functions to the linking process. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 25 '13 at 1:24
    
@FiddlingBits I complied gcc -o main main.c is there something wrong with this? –  Sogo Dec 25 '13 at 1:25
    
Did you link the employee.c and sort.c files too? (Answer: no — you used gcc -o main main.c instead of gcc -o main main.c sort.c employee.c.) The headers provide information about functions, but not the implementation. And headers most certainly don't mean that the program will link correctly unless you include the relevant object files (or specify the relevant source files on the command line). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 25 '13 at 1:25
1  
@Sogo You need to compile and link with the other source files or compile main only and then link with the other object files. The linker can't find some function defintions. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 25 '13 at 1:26
1  
Then you can't create a runnable program until you've written the functions that are mentioned in employee.h and sort.h. You have to provide the actual functions before you can create a runnable program. More accurately, you can't create a runnable program until you've provided a definition for every function called from main(), and every function called from the functions called from main(), and every function called from every one of the functions called from each of the functions called from main(), and so on. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 25 '13 at 1:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't have function definitions for the functions that your linker is complaining about. Add the following lines to the bottom of `main and it'll fix your linking problem:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    ...
}

int comp_employee (int *database[], int i, int j)
{
}

void swap_employee (int *data[], int i, int j)
{
}

void init_database( Database employees, int no_employees )
{
}

void print_database ( Database people, int no_employees)
{
}

void sort (int *data[], int n, comp_ptr compare, swap_ptr swap)
{
}

These are just the stubs. You must implement them in order for the logic to work.

share|improve this answer
    
It works! Thank you very much! I thought main just refer function's fact of existence or nonexistence, but it is wrong. –  Sogo Dec 25 '13 at 1:34
    
Thank you again Fiddling Bits and @JonathanLeffler ! Have a great Christmas! :) –  Sogo Dec 25 '13 at 1:35
    
I just wait until my 2 minutes limitations done. :) –  Sogo Dec 25 '13 at 1:39
    
@Sogo It would make more sense to put these definitions in a source file of there own though. Create an employee.c and sort.c file if it makes sense to put your function definitions there. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 25 '13 at 1:39

You had several things that made me scratch my head, but here is how I made it compile -

$ cat sort.h
/* file sort.h */

#include "employee.h"

#ifndef sort_h
#define sort_h
typedef int (*comp_ptr) (Database data, int s, int t);
typedef void(*swap_ptr) (Database data, int s, int t);

void sort (Database data, int n, comp_ptr compare, swap_ptr swap);

#endif /* sort.h */
$ cat employee.h 
/* file employee.h */

#ifndef employee_h
#define employee_h

typedef struct emp_struct {
    char name[100];
    int employee_no;
    float salary, tax_to_date;
} Employee;

typedef Employee *Database[10];

int comp_employee (Database database, int i, int j);
void swap_employee (Database data, int i, int j);

/* read in database (for this exercise fake it) */
void init_database( Database employees, int no_employees );

/* print out the database */
void print_database ( Database people, int no_employees);

#endif /* employee_h */ 
$ cat main.cc
#include "sort.h"
#include "employee.h"

int comp_employee (Database database, int i, int j) {}
void swap_employee (Database data, int i, int j) {}
void init_database( Database employees, int no_employees ) {}
void print_database ( Database people, int no_employees) {}
void sort (Database data, int n, comp_ptr compare, swap_ptr swap) {}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    const int no_employees = 10;
    Database people;
    init_database (people, no_employees);
    print_database(people, no_employees);
    sort(people, no_employees, comp_employee, swap_employee);
    print_database(people, no_employees);
    return 0; 
}
$ gcc main.cc
$ ./a.out
$
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. All of folks in this post teaches me error comes from not defining actual function. Btw, than you for your answer again. Happy Christmas. :) –  Sogo Dec 25 '13 at 1:37

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