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I've been pounding my head for a few days trying to figure out how to make a class have a nice clean public interface to perform registration of callback mechanisms. The callbacks can be C++11 lambdas, std::function<void(Type1,Type2)>, std::function<void(Type2)>, std::function<void()>, or the results of std::bind().

The key to this interface is that the user of the class only needs to know about one public interface that accepts pretty much any functor/callback mechanism the user might throw at it.

Simplified class showing registration of functors and interface

struct Type1;
struct Type2; // May be the same type as Type1
class MyRegistrationClass
{
public:
    /**
     * Clean and easy to understand public interface:
     * Handle registration of any functor matching _any_ of the following
     *    std::function<void(Type1,Type2)>
     *    std::function<void(Type2)>        <-- move argument 2 into arg 1
     *    std::function<void()>
     *    or any result of std::bind() requiring two or fewer arguments that
     *    can convert to the above std::function< ... > types.
     */
    template<typename F>
    void Register(F f) {
       doRegister(f);
    }
private:
    std::list< std::function< void(Type1, Type2) > > callbacks;


    // Handle registration for std::function<void(Type1,Type2)>
    template <typename Functor>
    void doRegister(const Functor & functor,
                           typename std::enable_if< 
                                   !is_bind_expr<Functor>
                                   && functor_traits<decltype(&Functor::operator())>::arity == 2
                               >::type * = nullptr )
    {
        callbacks.push_back( functor );
    }

    // Handle registration for std::function<void(Type2)> by using std::bind
    // to discard argument 2 ...
    template <typename Functor>
    void doRegister(const Functor & functor, 
                           typename std::enable_if< 
                                   !std::is_bind_expression< Functor >::value
                                   && functor_traits<decltype(&Functor::operator())>::arity == 1
                               >::type * = nullptr )
    {
        // bind _2 into functor
        callbacks.push_back( std::bind( functor,                              std::placeholders::_2 ) );
    }

    // Handle registration for std::function<void(Type2)> if given the results
    // of std::bind()
    template <typename Functor>
    void doRegister(const Functor & functor,
                           typename std::enable_if< 
                                   is_bind_expr<Functor>
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//// BEGIN Need arity of a bounded argument
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
                                   && functor_traits<decltype(Functor)>::arity == 1  
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//// END need arity of a bounded argument
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
                               >::type * = nullptr )
    {
        // Push the result of a bind() that takes a signature of void(Type2)
        // and push it into the callback list, it will automatically discard
        // argument1 when called, since we didn't bind _1 placeholder
        callbacks.push_back( functor );
    }

    // And other "doRegister" methods exist in this class to handle the other
    // types I want to support ...
}; // end class

The only reason to have the complexity of using enable_if<> is to turn on/off certain methods. We have to do this because when we want to pass in the results of std::bind() to the Register() method and it can ambiguously match against multiple registration methods if we had simple signatures like this:

void doRegister( std::function< void(Type1, Type2) > arg );
void doRegister( std::function< void(Type2) > arg ); // NOTE: type2 is first arg
void doRegister( std::function< void() > arg );

Rather than re-invent the wheel, I've referenced traits.hpp and then wrapped it with my own trait helper named "functor_traits" that adds support for std::bind()

This is what I've come up with so far to identify bounded function "arity" ... or a count of how many arguments the bind result expects as a :

My attempt at finding the bind result arity

#include <stdio.h>
// Get traits.hpp here: https://github.com/kennytm/utils/blob/master/traits.hpp
#include "traits.hpp" 

using namespace utils;
using namespace std;

void f1() {};
int f2(int) { return 0; }
char f3(int,int) { return 0; }

struct obj_func0 
{
    void operator()() {};
};
struct obj_func1
{
    int operator()(int) { return 0; };
};
struct obj_func2 
{
    char operator()(int,int) { return 0; };
};


/**
 * Count the number of bind placeholders in a variadic list
 */
template <typename ...Args>
struct get_placeholder_count
{
    static const int value = 0;
};
template <typename T, typename ...Args >
struct get_placeholder_count<T, Args...>
{
    static const int value = get_placeholder_count< Args... >::value + !!std::is_placeholder<T>::value;
};


/**
 * get_bind_arity<T> provides the number of arguments 
 * that a bounded expression expects to have passed in. 
 *  
 * This value is get_bind_arity<T>::arity
 */

template<typename T, typename ...Args>
struct get_bind_traits;

template<typename T, typename ...Args>
struct get_bind_traits< T(Args...) >
{
    static const int arity = get_placeholder_count<Args...>::value;
    static const int total_args = sizeof...(Args);
    static const int bounded_args = (total_args - arity);
};

template<template<typename, typename ...> class X, typename T, typename ...Args>
struct get_bind_traits<X<T, Args...>>
{
    // how many arguments were left unbounded by bind
    static const int arity        = get_bind_traits< T, Args... >::arity;

    // total arguments on function being called by bind
    static const int total_args   = get_bind_traits< T, Args... >::total_args;

    // how many arguments are bounded by bind:
    static const int bounded_args = (total_args - arity);

    // todo: add other traits (return type, args as tuple, etc
};

/**
 * Define wrapper "functor_traits" that wraps around existing function_traits
 */
template <typename T, typename Enable = void >
struct functor_traits;

// Use existing function_traits library (traits.hpp)
template <typename T>
struct functor_traits<T, typename enable_if< !is_bind_expression< T >::value >::type > :
    public function_traits<T>
{};

template <typename T>
struct functor_traits<T, typename enable_if< is_bind_expression< T >::value >::type >
{
    static const int arity = get_bind_traits<T>::arity;
};

/**
 * Proof of concept and test routine
 */
int main()
{
    auto lambda0 = [] {};
    auto lambda1 = [](int) -> int { return 0; };
    auto lambda2 = [](int,int) -> char { return 0;};
    auto func0 = std::function<void()>();
    auto func1 = std::function<int(int)>();
    auto func2 = std::function<char(int,int)>();
    auto oper0 = obj_func0();
    auto oper1 = obj_func1();
    auto oper2 = obj_func2();
    auto bind0 = bind(&f1);
    auto bind1 = bind(&f2, placeholders::_1);
    auto bind2 = bind(&f1, placeholders::_1, placeholders::_2);
    auto bindpartial = bind(&f1, placeholders::_1, 1);

    printf("action        : signature       : result\n");
    printf("----------------------------------------\n");
    printf("lambda arity 0: [](){}          : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(lambda0) >::arity );
    printf("lambda arity 1: [](int){}       : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(lambda1) >::arity );
    printf("lambda arity 2: [](int,int){}   : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(lambda2) >::arity );
    printf("func arity   0: void()          : %i\n", functor_traits< function<void()> >::arity );
    printf("func arity   1: int(int)        : %i\n", functor_traits< function<void(int)> >::arity );
    printf("func arity   2: char(int,int)   : %i\n", functor_traits< function<void(int,int)> >::arity );
    printf("C::operator()() arity 0         : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(oper0) >::arity );
    printf("C::operator()(int) arity 1      : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(oper1) >::arity );
    printf("C::operator()(int,int) arity 2  : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(oper2) >::arity );
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Testing the bind arity below:
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    printf("bind arity   0: void()          : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(bind0) >::arity );
    printf("bind arity   1: int(int)        : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(bind1) >::arity );
    printf("bind arity   2: void(int,int)   : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(bind2) >::arity );
    printf("bind arity   X: void(int, 1 )   : %i\n", functor_traits< decltype(bindpartial) >::arity );

    return 0;
}

While this implementation works in gcc with libstdc++, I'm not quite sure if this is a portable solution since it tries to break apart the results of std::bind() ... The nearly private "_Bind" class that we really shouldn't need to do as users of libstdc++.

So my questions are: How can we determine the arity of bind results without decomposing the result of std::bind()? and How can we implement a full implementation of function_traits that supports bounded arguments as much as possible?

share|improve this question
    
Simple: Don't. Let the user worry about how to handle your two arguments. std::bind already ignores arguments without suitable placeholders, so the user only needs to pass std::bind(f, _1, _2), std::bind(f, _1), std::bind(f, _2), or std::bind(f). Any solution that builds on decomposing through function_traits is inherently bad/broken anyways. –  Xeo Dec 25 '13 at 10:56
    
Xeo, sometimes behavioral changes are intended depending on argument order. But more importantly, the real problem being mentioned about is the need to prevent ambiguous matching of arguments. –  user3133626 Dec 26 '13 at 2:56

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