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I am trying to populate a List in C# but the values are not appearing in the array - though it does not throw an error until I try and set a variable with an array index (because it is out of range of course).

This is the exact return string strJSON I am seeing while debugging.

strJSON "{\"id\":34379899,\"name\":\"Revelation22\",\"profileIconId\":547,\"summonerLevel\":30,\"revisionDate\":1387913628000}"

Why is the List (array) not populating?

This is the code for KeyValue.cs (which to be honest I do not know yet why it needs another class)

namespace LoLSummoner
{
    public class KeyValue
    {
        public int id {get; set;}
        public string name {get; set;}
        public int profileIconId {get; set;}
        public int summonerLevel {get; set;}
        public int revisionDate {get; set;}
    }
}

And this is the code from Summoner.svc.cs

namespace LoLSummoner
{
    public class Summoner : ISummoner
    {

        public int GetSummonerID(string SummonerName)
        {
            int summonerId = 0;

            WebClient client = new WebClient();
            string strJSON = client.DownloadString("http://prod.api.pvp.net/api/lol/na/v1.2/summoner/by-name/" + SummonerName + "?api_key=xxxx");

            JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();

            KeyValue[] arrJSON = js.Deserialize<List<KeyValue>>(strJSON).ToArray();

            summonerId = Convert.ToInt32(arrJSON.GetValue(0));

            return summonerId;
        }
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+50
  1. Your RevisionDate property has to be long, because 1387913628000, and that's the value your trying to deserialize, exceeds int range.

  2. Your JSON contains information about only one KeyValue object, not an array of there, so you have to deserialize it as KeyValue, no KeyValue[]:

    KeyValue item = js.Deserialize<KeyValue>(strJSON);
    
  3. Having KeyValue instance you can use standard property syntax to return ID:

    return item.id;
    

I find this code working:

public class KeyValue
{
    public int id { get; set; }
    public string name { get; set; }
    public int profileIconId { get; set; }
    public int summonerLevel { get; set; }
    public long revisionDate { get; set; }
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var input = @"{""id"":34379899,""name"":""Revelation22"",""profileIconId"":547,""summonerLevel"":30,""revisionDate"":1387913628000}";

    JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();

     var item = js.Deserialize<KeyValue>(input);

     var summonerId = item.id;
}
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Your JSON contains a single object, not an array.
Therefore, you can only deserialize it as KeyValue.

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thanks for the hint.. –  JoJo Dec 25 '13 at 13:09
    
Should I be parsing this another way then? Can't I just split the string on : –  JoJo Dec 25 '13 at 14:13
2  
@JoJo: You don't have a list, so don't pretend that you do. js.Deserialize<KeyValue>(strJSON) –  SLaks Dec 25 '13 at 14:14
    
sorry getting No parameterless constructor defined for type how can I get an answer to my question? Should I ask again? What do I need to study in order to know what is going wrong? –  JoJo Dec 25 '13 at 14:54
    
Defined for which type? What's the stack trace? –  SLaks Dec 25 '13 at 16:07

I do not know yet why it needs another class

You don't need that class. It think the simplest way would be to deserialize your json directly to Dictionary<string, object>

var strJSON = "{\"id\":34379899,\"name\":\"Revelation22\",\"profileIconId\":547,\"summonerLevel\":30,\"revisionDate\":1387913628000}";

var dict = new JavaScriptSerializer()
           .Deserialize<Dictionary<string, object>>(strJSON);

Console.WriteLine(dict["name"]);
Console.WriteLine(ToDateTime((long)dict["revisionDate"]));

DateTime ToDateTime(long l)
{
    return  new DateTime(1970, 1, 1).AddMilliseconds(l);
}
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As already noted, the revisionDate will cause a runtime binding exception if it is not typed as a long.

public class KeyValue
{
    public int id { get; set; }
    public string name { get; set; }
    public int profileIconId { get; set; }
    public int summonerLevel { get; set; }
    public long revisionDate { get; set; }
}

In addition to that, you may wish to attempt a simple detection in order to deserialize this as either an object or an array of objects (if in the future the name is no longer unique).

public int GetSummonerID(string SummonerName)
{
    int summonerId = 0;

    WebClient client = new WebClient();
    string strJSON = client.DownloadString("http://prod.api.pvp.net/api/lol/na/v1.2/summoner/by-name/" + SummonerName + "?api_key=xxxx");

    JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();

    if(strJSON[0] == '[')
    {
        return js.Deserialize<KeyValue[]>(strJSON)[0].id;
    }
    else
    {
        return js.Deserialize<KeyValue>(strJSON).id;
    }
    return summonerId;
}
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One thing to note is that your JSON string contains only a single KeyValue, not a list of them. Another problem is that the revision date is too large to fit in a 32 bit int, so consider using a long instead.

Here's some example code that reads your sample string and prints out some of the values.

public class KeyValue
{
    public int id { get; set; }
    public string name { get; set; }
    public int profileIconId { get; set; }
    public int summonerLevel { get; set; }
    public long revisionDate { get; set; }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var strJSON = "{\"id\":34379899,\"name\":\"Revelation22\",\"profileIconId\":547,\"summonerLevel\":30,\"revisionDate\":1387913628000}";
    var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

    var keyValue = serializer.Deserialize<KeyValue>(strJSON);
    var id = keyValue.id;
    var name = keyValue.name;
    var level = keyValue.summonerLevel;

    Console.WriteLine("Summoner name:{0}, Id:{1}, Level:{2}", name, id, level);
    Console.Read();
}
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