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I have the following code

void mergesort(int size, int ar[], int temp[])
{
    if(size <=1)
    {
        return;}
    else
    {
        int i = 0;
        int mid = size/2;

        int *left = &ar[0];
        int *right = &ar[mid];
        int *rend = &ar[size];
        int *lend = right;

        mergesort(mid,left,temp);
        mergesort(size-mid,right,temp);

        for(i=0; i<size;i++)
        {
            if(left < lend && (*left < *right || right >= rend))
            {
                temp[i] = *left++;
            }
            else
            {
                temp[i] = *right++;
            }
        }
        for(i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            ar[i] = temp[i];
        }
    }
}

I couldn't understand how this if statement works:

if(left < lend && (*left < *right || right >= rend))
{
   temp[i] = *left++;
}
else
{
   temp[i] = *right++;
}

Can you tell me what's going on in there? Why do we have to compare addresses? (left < lend and right >= rend)

Here's how the mergesort function is called from main

const int SIZE = 8;
int array[SIZE] = {3,6,1,-9,0,2,4,5};
int temp[SIZE];

mergesort(SIZE, array,temp);
share|improve this question
    
Because arrays stored as sequential memory addresses? –  Hariprasad Dec 25 '13 at 14:11
    
Consider what would happen if you didn't. What would prevent reading off the ends of the (sub-)arrays? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 25 '13 at 14:11
    
That said, this code looks broken to me. If right reaches the end of the array, then it still gets dereferenced in *left < *right, which invokes undefined behaviour. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 25 '13 at 14:13
    
@OliCharlesworth Yes, should be (right >= rend || *left < *right). –  user1990169 Dec 25 '13 at 14:25
    
@AbhishekBansal: It's only not checked if left == lend ;) –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 25 '13 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In order to choose the input between the left or right sequences, you need to know if the sequence is exhausted. You check this by testing the pointer to see if it's beyond the valid range. left < lend returns true if the left sequence is not exhausted, and right >= rend returns true if the right sequence is exhausted. Thus the if will be taken when the left sequence isn't exhausted, and either the left item is less than the right item or the right sequence is exhausted.

If you were following the standard library iterator conventions, you would never check for < or > in a comparison. left != lend and right == rend would work just as well in the code you posted.

P.S. two thoughts that aren't part of your question:

  1. As noted in the comments, there's undefined behavior lurking in the comparison. You need to test if the right side is exhausted before checking the value at the right side pointer.
  2. Merge sort is naturally stable if you use the correct comparison. You want any ties to take from the left sequence. In your case of sorting ints it doesn't matter since you can't tell one identical int from another, but if this was just a key in part of a larger structure it could matter greatly. It's just a matter of replacing < with <=.

Taking all the above suggestions together you end up with:

if (left != lend && (right == rend || *left <= *right))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you! But I went ahead with your suggestion and changed the if test condition. It works fine but I just wanted to know what's going on in there so I just put std::cout << *right in the first for-loop, above the if statement. At some point *right will have a value of (-858993460). I've had the same problem with the if test condition i posted. This happens a lot when the array that is passed is in descending order. Does it mean I have to re-write the whole code? But it sorts numbers without problems. –  Kidus Dec 26 '13 at 5:59
    
@DJK, you're running into undefined behavior when *right is past the end of the array. Anything could happen; you could get a nonsense number, your program could crash, or demons could fly out of your nose. That's why I suggested rearranging the if condition so that the test for out-of-bounds would come first. That's OK because || is short circuiting, meaning it will skip the second half of the condition if the first half is true. –  Mark Ransom Dec 26 '13 at 19:54

Hariprasad is right. Then you make a comparison left < lend, you compare the addresses of some elements. Because array is a concequtive set of addresses, the pointers can be used like the indexes and iterators. And then you make the comparison *left < *right, for example, you compare the values, of course, and determine the less of them.

share|improve this answer

There are multiple problems with this code:

  1. int *rend = &ar[size]; -- Reads beyond the end of the array ar
  2. (*left < *right || right >= rend) -- I believe this should be (right > (rend - 1) || (*left > *right)) in order to avoid reading beyond the end of ar.

You can work it out for yourself by stepping through the code with an initial array size of 2 or 3. Either exposes the problems quickly. I did this quickly in my head but did not test with a debugger. Caveat Emptor.

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