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Here's my method:

public char[] ReturnAllVowels(String word)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < word.length(); i++)
    {
        if (word.contains("a" || "e" || "i" || "o" || "u"))     
        {

        }
    }        
}

It says that || cannot be applied to String class. How can I do this then?

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2  
Your method name should be lowercase (returnAllVowels) in Java. Your question says that you want to get the vowel counter, but your function returns char[]. Do you want a counter or do you want to get the actual vowels contained? –  Peter Lang Jan 16 '10 at 13:39
    
The actual vowels contained, and I don't really have to start with lowercase. That's just a matter of taste. Everyone has their own way of writing. –  Sergio Tapia Jan 16 '10 at 13:48
5  
Taste is something like choosing to put opening braces on a new line, your job is to make code that people can understand, uppercase at the beginning of an identifier usually indicates (in Java) a class name rather than a method name. –  Derek Mortimer Jan 16 '10 at 14:01
    
Also singe starting with a lowercase is an age-old convention, there's a lot of especially reflection based tools which may break if you don't follow the said convention. –  Esko Jan 16 '10 at 15:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
char ch = word.charAt (i);
if (ch == 'a' || ch=='e') {

}
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Hey, minusers, leave comments at least. –  Roman Jan 16 '10 at 13:49
5  
i didn't minus you, but, well --- what is that code? –  nickf Jan 16 '10 at 14:21

Using regular expressions you can try.

int count = word.replaceAll("[^aeiouAEIOU]","").length();
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3  
+1: A Functional Programming solution! :) –  Carl Smotricz Jan 16 '10 at 13:45
    String regex = "[aeiou]";               
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex,Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);   
    int vowelcount = 0;
    Matcher m = p.matcher(content);
    while (m.find()) {
      vowelcount++;
    }
    System.out.println("Total vowels: " + vowelcount);
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You can use Peter's code to get the vowels.

char[] vowels = word.replaceAll("[^aeiouAEIOU]","").toCharArray();
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This is the way I did it

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO code application logic here

    // TODO code application logic here
    String s;
    //String vowels = a;
    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    s = in.nextLine();

    for(int i = 0; i<s.length();i++){
        char v = s.charAt(i);
        if(v=='a' || v=='e' || v=='i' || v=='o' || v=='u' || v=='A' || v=='E' || v=='I' || v=='O' || v=='U'){
            System.out.print (v);
        }
    }
}
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Here's what I would have done using Scanner.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

    String userInput;
    int vowelA = 0, vowelE = 0, vowelI = 0, vowelO = 0, vowelU = 0; 

    System.out.println(welcomeMessage);
    userInput = scan.nextLine();
    userInput = userInput.toLowerCase();

    for(int x = 0; x <= userInput.length() - 1; x++) {
        if(userInput.charAt(x) == 97)
            vowelA++;
        else if(userInput.charAt(x) == 101)
            vowelE++;
        else if(userInput.charAt(x) == 105)
            vowelI++;
        else if(userInput.charAt(x) == 111)
            vowelO++;
        else if(userInput.charAt(x) == 117)
            vowelU++;   
    } 

    System.out.println("There were " + vowelA + " A's in your sentence.");
    System.out.println("There were " + vowelE + " E's in your sentence.");
    System.out.println("There were " + vowelI + " I's in your sentence.");
    System.out.println("There were " + vowelO + " O's in your sentence.");
    System.out.println("There were " + vowelU + " U's in your sentence.");
}
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