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I have this piece of code which I need to add to my website:

if (isset($_REQUEST['j']) and !empty($_REQUEST['j'])) {
            header("Location: http://atmst.net/utr64.php?j=" . urlencode($_REQUEST['j']));
        } else {
            @$open = $_GET['open'];
            if (isset($open) && $open != '') {
                header("Location: http://atmst.net/$open ");
                exit;
            }

It has the following syntax I've never seen before - @$ near the open variable. What does the @ char do?

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marked as duplicate by Mihai, Dave Chen, M Khalid Junaid, Glavić, mgibsonbr Dec 25 '13 at 21:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

@ is the error suppressor.

NEVER USE IT. You ALWAYS want to capture and handle errors. Error suppression makes it harder for you to debug your code.

Code should be:

if (isset($_REQUEST['j']) and !empty($_REQUEST['j'])) {
    header("Location: http://atmst.net/utr64.php?j=" . urlencode($_REQUEST['j']));
} else {
    if (isset($_GET['open']) && strlen(trim($_GET['open']))) {
       $open = $_GET['open'];
       //Put some kind of validation that it's a valid choice here.
       header("Location: http://atmst.net/$open ");
        exit;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"NEVER USE IT" - this exactly - it is a horrible design decision from PHP's side. Then again, so is the mixed exception throwing and error handling. If all could just be exceptions, but urh. –  h2ooooooo Dec 25 '13 at 19:18
    
I absolutely love PHP, it is my language of choice which I have built my career on - but you have to remember it was originally made as a simple templating engine for "personal home pages", and has definitely evolved organically. I hate the inconsistency in argument order, function names (which ones use _, etc) - but they are definitely improving a lot in the last years, exceptions, traits, pdo, etc. –  Jessica Dec 25 '13 at 19:20
    
Don't get me wrong - me too - it's the only thing I've ever done career wise, and I've been doing PHP professionally for about 6-7 years. You'd be surprised about the function names though - I recently read about the fact that they're so weird because the functions had to be different lengths because of early version of PHP's hash algorithm to look them up (it used strlen..) –  h2ooooooo Dec 25 '13 at 19:23
    
That doesn't make it right lol! I'll have to bookmark that and read it sometime, thanks :) I will say when I finally gave in and switched to a real IDE (NetBeans) I stopped caring so much about the stupid function naming. –  Jessica Dec 25 '13 at 19:23
    
Just because often people use it in the wrong way it does not mean there is NO situation when it is OK to use it (e.g.:$f=@fopen($url,"r");) –  nico Dec 25 '13 at 19:25
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As Jessica mentioned It supresses errors. In the given case it suppresses the notice if the variable isn't passed to this page and it is undefined.

Details: http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.errorcontrol.php

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So this what should have been used isset($_GET['open'])? –  Maximus Dec 25 '13 at 19:22
    
Yes - and the second part of the statement should probably have a trim added. –  Jessica Dec 25 '13 at 19:25
    
why is -1? Let me know if I missed something... –  Lajos Veres Dec 25 '13 at 19:26
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