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I know how to fill an std::vector with non-trivial initial values, e.g. sequence numbers:

void IndexArray( unsigned int length, std::vector<unsigned int>& v )
{
    v.resize(length);
    for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < length; ++i )
    {
        v[i] = i;
    }
}

But this is a for-loop. Is there an elegant way to do this with less lines of code using stl functionality (and not using Boost)?

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6 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can use the generate algorithm, for a more general way of filling up containers:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

struct c_unique {
   int current;
   c_unique() {current=0;}
   int operator()() {return ++current;}
} UniqueNumber;


int main () {
  vector<int> myvector (8);
  generate (myvector.begin(), myvector.end(), UniqueNumber);

  cout << "\nmyvector contains:";
  for (vector<int>::iterator it=myvector.begin(); it!=myvector.end(); ++it)
    cout << " " << *it;

  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}

This was shamelessly lifted and edited from cplusplusreference.

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He may want to start with v[i] == i but change it later in the code. –  paxdiablo Oct 16 '08 at 8:37
    
yes probably, i was hoping he'd explain the case. there may possibly be a better method than filling em up first. Like a lazy evaluation-ish way or something. –  moogs Oct 16 '08 at 8:40
    
I made my question more general, since the question was really about initializing with non-trivial values. I indeed wanted to fill the array with index numbers, to be able to permute them later. There probably will be other solutions to that as well. –  andreas buykx Oct 16 '08 at 11:08
    
right, removed the question. Perhaps you can post that permutation question? The solution might be interesting :) –  moogs Oct 16 '08 at 11:26
    
@moog NOTE: generate may make a copy or copies of the function you provide it, this code might generate the sequence "1 1 1 1 ..". Instead, use tr1::ref to pass a reference-wrapper that refers to UniqueNumber, to avoid copies: generate(.. tr1::ref(UniqueNumber) ); –  Aaron Oct 16 '08 at 17:59
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I usually go with std::generate plus a simple generator:

template <typename T>
struct gen {
    T x;
    gen(T seed) : x(seed) { }

    T operator ()() { return x++; }
};

generate(a.begin(), a.end(), gen<int>(0));
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If you're using SGI STL (or a derivative, such as STLPort), you can use iota. :-)

void IndexArray(unsigned int length, vector<unsigned int>& v)
{
    vector<unsigned int>(length).swap(v);
    iota(v.begin(), v.end(), 0);
}
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There is also a iota() function in adobe.ASL, (and a value_iterator as well). In boost, there is a counting_iterator, and I suspect a few other ways to do generate number sequences on the fly in boost.

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I know this has already been answered, but I prefer the "fill" function in the algorithm library, since it's seems more intuitive for me to read:

// fill algorithm example
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  vector<int> myvector (8);                       // myvector: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  fill (myvector.begin(),myvector.begin()+4,5);   // myvector: 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0
  fill (myvector.begin()+3,myvector.end()-2,8);   // myvector: 5 5 5 8 8 8 0 0

  cout << "myvector contains:";
  for (vector<int>::iterator it=myvector.begin(); it!=myvector.end(); ++it)
    cout << " " << *it;

  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}

This too was also shamelessly lifted from cplusplusreference.

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How would you use this to fill a vector with progressive numbers as asked? –  DarioP Aug 14 '13 at 14:20
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If you have a C style array you can use std:copy, e.g.,

int c_array[] = {3,4,5};

const int* pbegin = &c_array[0];
const size_t c_array_size = sizeof(c_array) / sizeof(c_array[0]);
const int* pend  = pbegin + c_array_size;

std::vector<int> v;
v.reserve(c_array_size);
std::copy(pbegin, pend, std:back_inserter(v));
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