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I have problems running plone 4.3.2 after installation (in Fedora 18). I'm using the unified installer. I've already re-installed it several times with the same problem. I'm using the unified installed. I've used Plone 2 and 3 without problems so I'm not sure what's happening here. There seems to be some permission issue. The README seems to say that "plonectl start" should be called using plone_daemon. However the Plone folder is owned by plone_buildout. I've included the installation output and also a printout of the permissions of the Plone directory.

Can someone tell me what to do. Thanks.

[root@localhost Plone-4.3.2-UnifiedInstaller]# ./install.sh zeo --password=admin

Testing /usr/bin/python2.7 for Zope/Plone requirements....
/usr/bin/python2.7 looks OK. We'll try to use it.

Root install method chosen. Will install for use by users:
  ZEO & Client Daemons:      plone_daemon
  Code Resources & buildout: plone_buildout

Detailed installation log being written to /home/student/Desktop/Plone-4.3.2-UnifiedInstaller/install.log
Installing Plone 4.3.2 at /usr/local/Plone

Using useradd and groupadd to create users and groups.
useradd: warning: the home directory already exists.
Not copying any file from skel directory into it.
Creating mailbox file: File exists
useradd: warning: the home directory already exists.
Not copying any file from skel directory into it.
Creating mailbox file: File exists
Creating python virtual environment, no site packages.
New python executable in /usr/local/Plone/Python-2.7/bin/python2.7
Also creating executable in /usr/local/Plone/Python-2.7/bin/python
Installing Setuptools..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................done.
Installing Pip.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................done.
Compiling and installing jpeg local libraries ...
Unpacking buildout cache to /usr/local/Plone/buildout-cache
Copying Plone-docs
Setting /usr/local/Plone ownership to plone_buildout:plone_group
Copying buildout skeleton
Fixing up bin/buildout
Building Zope/Plone; this takes a while...
Buildout completed

#####################################################################
######################  Installation Complete  ######################

Plone successfully installed at /usr/local/Plone
See /usr/local/Plone/zeocluster/README.html
for startup instructions

Use the account information below to log into the Zope Management Interface
The account has full 'Manager' privileges.

  Username: admin
  Password: admin

This account is created when the object database is initialized. If you change
the password later (which you should!), you'll need to use the new password.

Use this account only to create Plone sites and initial users. Do not use it
for routine login or maintenance. 

- If you need help, ask the mailing lists or #plone on irc.freenode.net.
- The live support channel also exists at http://plone.org/chat
- You can read/post to the lists via http://plone.org/forums

- Submit feedback and report errors at http://dev.plone.org/plone
(For install problems, specify component "Installer (Unified)")

[root@localhost Plone-4.3.2-UnifiedInstaller]# sudo -u plone_daemon /usr/local/Plone/zeocluster/bin/plonectl start
sudo: unable to execute /usr/local/Plone/zeocluster/bin/plonectl: Permission denied
[root@localhost Plone-4.3.2-UnifiedInstaller]# cd /usr/local/Plone/
[root@localhost Plone]# ls -la
total 24
drwxr-sr-x.  6 plone_buildout plone_group 4096 Dec 25 14:59 .
drwxr-xr-x. 12 root           root        4096 Dec 25 14:56 ..
drwxr-xr-x.  4 plone_buildout plone_group 4096 Mar  8  2011 buildout-cache
drwx------.  2 plone_buildout plone_group 4096 Dec 25 14:56 Plone-docs
drwxr-xr-x.  7 plone_buildout plone_group 4096 Dec 25 14:56 Python-2.7
drwx--S---.  8 plone_buildout plone_group 4096 Dec 25 14:59 zeocluster
[root@localhost Plone]# ls -la zeocluster/
total 128
drwx--S---. 8 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:59 .
drwxr-sr-x. 6 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:59 ..
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group   424 Dec 25 14:59 adminPassword.txt
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  8765 Dec 25 14:56 base.cfg
drwx--S---. 2 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:59 bin
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group 10525 Dec 25 14:56 bootstrap.py
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  6812 Dec 25 14:56 buildout.cfg
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  4399 Dec 25 14:56 develop.cfg
drwxr-sr-x. 2 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:56 develop-eggs
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group 18297 Dec 25 14:59 .installed.cfg
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group   815 Dec 25 14:56 lxml_static.cfg
drwxr-sr-x. 5 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:59 parts
drwx--S---. 2 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:56 products
-rw-r--r--. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  3469 Dec 25 14:59 README.html
drwx--S---. 3 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:56 src
drwxrws---. 7 plone_buildout plone_group  4096 Dec 25 14:59 var
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  9521 Dec 25 14:56 versions.cfg
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  1902 Dec 25 14:56 zopeapp-versions.cfg
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  1022 Dec 25 14:56 zope-versions.cfg
-rw-------. 1 plone_buildout plone_group  2518 Dec 25 14:56 ztk-versions.cfg
[root@localhost Plone]# 
share|improve this question
    
Where is the "error" you are talking about? – Bahman M. Dec 26 '13 at 5:25
1  
Take a look at those directories with capital-S in the group bits. Those are fouled up. All those also need g+rx (group read and execute). Any chance that those got changed after install, or that a security policy might be preventing setting those bits? – SteveM Dec 26 '13 at 5:48
1  
While you're trying to figure this out, it's perfectly reasonable to create a zope or plone user and install (without sudo) as that user. The plone_buildout/plone_daemon/plone_group scheme prevents the zope daemon from writing into code file space, but it's a security refinement, not an absolute requirement. – SteveM Dec 26 '13 at 5:54
    
@stevem: Thanks! It works after chmod g+rx. – user2926204 Dec 28 '13 at 17:33
    
@stevem: I take that back ... after the chmod with g+rx in the /usr/local/Plone, there is no more permission error when I do "plonectl -start". But it now says "daemon manager not running". – user2926204 Dec 28 '13 at 17:53

It definitely looks like a permissions problem. Probably having to do with a Fedora security policy.

In all honesty: there really is no reason to install Plone as root. Please continue with installing it as a normal (dedicated, but non-omnipotent) user account. That will ease a lot of your problems later.

share|improve this answer
    
Then why does the README of plone says "The non-root method produces an install that will run the Zope server with the same privileges as the installing user. This is probably not an acceptable security profile for a production server, but may be acceptable for testing and development purposes or if you create an unprivileged user exclusively for this purpose." – user2926204 Dec 28 '13 at 17:56
2  
When you use "sudo" with the Unified Installer it uses root privileges to create a pair of unprivileged users and a group. It then drops root privileges and runs the installer under the plone_buildout user. It sets up plone/zope to run under plone_daemon. This is, for a couple of reasons, a bit more sophisticated security profile than simply installing as a regular user: 1) It makes sure the user running the daemon does not have a home directory or shell; 2) It makes sure the daemon cannot overwrite code files. – SteveM Dec 28 '13 at 22:33
    
This is correct and can increase security, but a gotcha is that some distributions (hi Suse!) have a habit of rather strict SE-policies that can fsck things up. – polyester Jan 7 '14 at 10:57

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