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I know there are many ways to remove/add library dependencies reported prior to compiling an executable for use in Linux. However, after a bit of searching I have not been able to find the way to bypass these dependencies when given only the executable and no binaries. For example, if I run ldd on the executable and there is a shared library that is not found and I do not think is necessary for the program to run.

Thank you

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If there's a library dependency reported by ldd, then that executable needs symbols from that library. You may be able to make your own "fake" library that resolves those symbols, and point the executable to it with LD_LIBRARY_PATH, but you really need to know what you're doing. – Joe Z Dec 25 '13 at 23:30
    
Also, you can use weak linkage (but then the executable needs to be compiled with weak linkage enabled, specifically.) – user529758 Dec 25 '13 at 23:32
    
@JoeZ "If there's a library dependency reported by ldd, then that executable needs symbols from that library." -- that statement is incorrect. – Employed Russian Dec 26 '13 at 0:47
    
@EmployedRussian : Ok, it's possible for a library to show up in the ldd list and not be needed. I haven't seen it happen in my experience. Your answer below, though, does provide a way to test. – Joe Z Dec 26 '13 at 1:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For example, if I run ldd on the executable and there is a shared library that is not found and I do not think is necessary for the program to run.

You can trivially test whether your belief is correct: create an empty "stub" shared library with the name that ldd reports as not found, and test whether the executable runs correctly when you make use of that stub (e.g. via LD_LIBRARY_PATH).

If the executable does in fact work (which is somewhat unlikely), you can binary-patch the .dynamic section of the executable to remove the unnecessary dependency -- .dynamic is simply a fixed-sized table of Elf{32,64}_Dyn records, terminated by a record with .d_tag == DT_NULL (the needed libraries are represented by records with .d_tag == DT_NEEDED. You can therefore find the unnecessary record, and simply "slide" all following records one slot up in the table.

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How can I actually edit the .dynamic section? Do you have any recommendations? – user3135363 Dec 29 '13 at 21:29

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