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I've been researching for an Arduino project I will be starting soon and I came across some relevant code (Un-commented...) but I can't seem to decipher how the most important part works! The way the code should work is there are 4 bytes in question (yaw, pitch, throttle, and trim (all dec values)) and each bit in each byte corresponds to a sequence of LED flashes encoded in the sendZero() and sendOne() commands. Here is the code in question:

void sendCommand() {

    byte b;

    sendHeader();

    for (int i=0; i<=7; i++) {

        b = (yaw & (1 << i)) >> i;
        if (b > 0) sendOne(); else sendZero();

    }

    for (int i=0; i<=7; i++) {

        b = (pitch & (1 << i)) >> i;
        if (b > 0) sendOne(); else sendZero();

    }

    for (int i=0; i<=7; i++) {

        b = (throttle & (1 << i)) >> i;
        if (b > 0) sendOne(); else sendZero();

    }

    for (int i=0; i<=7; i++) {

        b = (trim & (1 << i)) >> i;
        if (b > 0) sendOne(); else sendZero();

    }

}

The part that gets me is the inside of each for-loop as I have no clue what's going on with those bitwise operations. My guess is they are somehow converting the dec value into binary and then iterating through it, registering zeros or ones accordingly? It's this:

b = (x & (1 << i)) >> i;

where I can't seem to see what's going on or why. Any help would be appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

You are checking the each bit of x (0 to 7) in the code by doing

b = (x & (1 << i)) >> i;

Say for example: You want to display 0 on the led. the seven segment code for displaying 0 on led is 0X3F (The variable x has the value 0X3F). (For more on seven segment display).

You are checking the each bit of the 0X3F and the variable 'b' has the value whether the bit i is 0 or 1.

`0X3F` is 
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
    3      F

For example:

int main()
{
    int i, x, b;
    x = 0x3F;
    for(i = 0; i< 7; i++)
    {
        b = (x & (1 << i)) >> i;
        printf("%d ", b); // I am printing the value of b here
    }
    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Will print

1 1 1 1 1 1 0

when you say

    b = (yaw & (1 << i)) >> i;
    if (b > 0) sendOne(); else sendZero();

the variable yaw is having the seven segment code for the number you want to display on LED and you are checking each bit of yaw. If the bit is 1 you are calling sendOne() function, which might be sending a high voltage to the LED and which will light up the corresponding LED in the 7 segment display. If the bit is 0, you are calling sendZero() to send a low voltage.

Here you can notice that you are trying to light up the individual LEDs in the 7 Segment. The above program will be so fast that, you will see all the LEDs (who's bits are 1 as per the 7 segment code)lighted up.

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1  
+1 Of course, a smarter programmer would use if (x&(1<<i)) to save memory and processing time... –  LS_dev Dec 26 '13 at 9:39

Those are left shifts << and right shifts >> respectively.

A left shift is equivalent to multiplication by some power of two.

a << 1; // a * 2.

A right shift is division,

a >> 1; // a / 2.

The constant one is indicates 21 (or the value 2).

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I knew that, but the statement as a whole I'm just not getting what's going on. –  JackSac67 Dec 26 '13 at 4:46

To expand. each x & (1 << i) is creating a mask of the desired bit and testing it against x

x & 00000001
x & 00000010
etc..
x & 01000000
x & 10000000

and then shifting the bit of interest down to the LSB so that it can be tested with b = (result of mask and input) >> i; as to transmit either a one or zero. Where the for loop walks the desired bit across the byte.

Note: this later part is not really needed as it will be greater then zero, regardless of it being shifted to the 1's bit.


since you are looking at helicopter code. I would like to point out mine, as I have decoded several common 3.5ch. Library and Demo INO it is a bit cleaner in that bit structures assemble the message and a union shifts it all out, regardless of the different formats.

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Thanks for clearing this up. I was trying to make sense of that last ">> i" part and kept thinking "What's the point of this?" I guess there was no point other than to just keep consistency with 1s and 0s instead of 2^x and 0s? –  JackSac67 Dec 29 '13 at 1:52

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