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Input

known_array : numpy array; consisting of scalar values only; shape: (m, 1)

test_array : numpy array; consisting of scalar values only; shape: (n, 1)

Output

indices : numpy array; shape: (n, 1); For each value in test_array finds the index of the closest value in known_array

residual : numpy array; shape: (n, 1); For each value in test_array finds the difference from the closest value in known_array

Example

In [17]: known_array = np.array([random.randint(-30,30) for i in range(5)])

In [18]: known_array
Out[18]: array([-24, -18, -13, -30,  29])

In [19]: test_array = np.array([random.randint(-10,10) for i in range(10)])

In [20]: test_array
Out[20]: array([-6,  4, -6,  4,  8, -4,  8, -6,  2,  8])

Sample Implementation (Not fully vectorized)

def find_nearest(known_array, value):
    idx = (np.abs(known_array - value)).argmin()
    diff = known_array[idx] - value
    return [idx, -diff]

In [22]: indices = np.zeros(len(test_array))

In [23]: residual = np.zeros(len(test_array))

In [24]: for i in range(len(test_array)):
   ....:     [indices[i], residual[i]] =  find_nearest(known_array, test_array[i])
   ....:     

In [25]: indices
Out[25]: array([ 2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  2.])

In [26]: residual
Out[26]: array([  7.,  17.,   7.,  17.,  21.,   9.,  21.,   7.,  15.,  21.])

What is the best way to speed up this task? Cython is an option, but, I would always prefer to be able to remove the for loop and let the code remain are pure NumPy.


NB: Following Stack Overflow questions were consulted

  1. Python/Numpy - Quickly Find the Index in an Array Closest to Some Value
  2. Find the index of numerically closest value
  3. find nearest value in numpy array
  4. Finding the nearest value and return the index of array in Python
  5. finding nearest items across two lists/arrays in Python

Updates

I did some small benchmarks for comparing the non-vectorized and vectorized solution (accepted answer).

In [48]: [indices1, residual1] = find_nearest_vectorized(known_array, test_array)

In [53]: [indices2, residual2] = find_nearest_non_vectorized(known_array, test_array)

In [54]: indices1==indices2
Out[54]: array([ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True],   dtype=bool)

In [55]: residual1==residual2
Out[55]: array([ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)

In [56]: %timeit [indices2, residual2] = find_nearest_non_vectorized(known_array, test_array)
10000 loops, best of 3: 173 µs per loop

In [57]: %timeit [indices1, residual1] = find_nearest_vectorized(known_array, test_array)
100000 loops, best of 3: 16.8 µs per loop

About a 10-fold speedup!

Clarification

known_array is not sorted.

I ran the benchmarks as given in the answer by @cyborg below.

Case 1: If known_array were sorted

known_array = np.arange(0,1000)
test_array = np.random.randint(0, 100, 10000)
print('Speedups:')
base_time = time_f('base')
for func_name in ['diffs', 'searchsorted1', 'searchsorted2']:
    print func_name + ' is x%.1f faster than base.' % (base_time / time_f(func_name))
    assert np.allclose(base(known_array, test_array), eval(func_name+'(known_array, test_array)'))

Speedups:
diffs is x0.4 faster than base.
searchsorted1 is x81.3 faster than base.
searchsorted2 is x107.6 faster than base.

Firstly, for large arrays diffs method is actually slower, it also eats up a lot of RAM and my system hanged when I ran it on actual data.

Case 2 : When known_array is not sorted; which represents actual scenario

known_array = np.random.randint(0,100,100)
test_array = np.random.randint(0, 100, 100)

Speedups:
diffs is x8.9 faster than base.
AssertionError                            Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-26-3170078c217a> in <module>()
      5 for func_name in ['diffs', 'searchsorted1', 'searchsorted2']:
      6     print func_name + ' is x%.1f faster than base.' % (base_time /  time_f(func_name))
----> 7     assert np.allclose(base(known_array, test_array),  eval(func_name+'(known_array, test_array)'))

AssertionError: 


searchsorted1 is x14.8 faster than base.

I must also comment that the approach should also be memory efficient. Otherwise my 8 GB of RAM is not sufficient. In the base case, it is easily sufficient.

share|improve this question
    
It does not matter if your data is sorted; the method posted by HYRY takes care of that scenario, and has linear rather than the quadratic memory performance of the diff method; his answer should be marked as the correct one –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Jan 14 '14 at 21:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For example, you can compute all the differences in on go with:

differences = (test_array.reshape(1,-1) - known_array.reshape(-1,1))

And use argmin and fancy indexing along with np.diagonal to get desired indices and differences:

indices = np.abs(differences).argmin(axis=0)
residual = np.diagonal(differences[indices,])

So for

>>> known_array = np.array([-24, -18, -13, -30,  29])
>>> test_array = np.array([-6,  4, -6,  4,  8, -4,  8, -6,  2,  8])

One get

>>> indices
array([2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2])
>>> residual
array([ 7, 17,  7, 17, 21,  9, 21,  7, 15, 21])
share|improve this answer
    
The solution works! I am just doing some small benchmarks to compare the performance. Would be great if you can highlight how you thought about vectorizing this task. That would be of more help! –  Nipun Batra Dec 26 '13 at 6:33
    
Added the benchmarks in the Update section of the question. It may also be helpful to discuss the memory requirements by the two versions. –  Nipun Batra Dec 26 '13 at 6:39

If the array is large, you should use searchsorted:

import numpy as np
np.random.seed(0)
known_array = np.random.rand(1000)
test_array = np.random.rand(400)

%%time
differences = (test_array.reshape(1,-1) - known_array.reshape(-1,1))
indices = np.abs(differences).argmin(axis=0)
residual = np.diagonal(differences[indices,])

output:

CPU times: user 11 ms, sys: 15 ms, total: 26 ms
Wall time: 26.4 ms

searchsorted version:

%%time

index_sorted = np.argsort(known_array)
known_array_sorted = known_array[index_sorted]

idx1 = np.searchsorted(known_array_sorted, test_array)
idx2 = np.clip(idx1 - 1, 0, len(known_array_sorted)-1)

diff1 = known_array_sorted[idx1] - test_array
diff2 = test_array - known_array_sorted[idx2]

indices2 = index_sorted[np.where(diff1 <= diff2, idx1, idx2)]
residual2 = test_array - known_array[indices]

output:

CPU times: user 0 ns, sys: 0 ns, total: 0 ns
Wall time: 311 µs

We can check that the results is the same:

assert np.all(residual == residual2)
assert np.all(indices == indices2)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't quiet get the same results from both the methods –  Nipun Batra Dec 26 '13 at 13:37
    
I have added a Clarification section towards the end of the question to explain this –  Nipun Batra Dec 28 '13 at 5:16
    
The search sorted algorithm works well for me but it fails if any value of test_array is larger than the max value of known_array. In this case, np.searchsorted will return an index which is 1 too large to be used as an index into known_array_sorted. I have edited the answer above to fix this case. Please check it works for you! –  Jack Kelly Jul 8 '14 at 14:24

TL;DR: use numpy.searchsorted().

import inspect
from timeit import timeit
import numpy as np

known_array = np.arange(-10, 10)
test_array = np.random.randint(-10, 10, 1000)
number = 1000

def base(known_array, test_array):
    def find_nearest(known_array, value):
        idx = (np.abs(known_array - value)).argmin()
        return idx
    indices = np.zeros_like(test_array, dtype=known_array.dtype)
    for i in range(len(test_array)):
        indices[i] =  find_nearest(known_array, test_array[i])
    return indices

def diffs(known_array, test_array):
    differences = (test_array.reshape(1,-1) - known_array.reshape(-1,1))
    indices = np.abs(differences).argmin(axis=0)
    return indices

def searchsorted1(known_array, test_array):
    index_sorted = np.argsort(known_array)
    known_array_sorted = known_array[index_sorted]
    idx1 = np.searchsorted(known_array_sorted, test_array)
    idx1[idx1 == len(known_array)] = len(known_array)-1
    idx2 = np.clip(idx1 - 1, 0, len(known_array_sorted)-1)
    diff1 = known_array_sorted[idx1] - test_array
    diff2 = test_array - known_array_sorted[idx2]
    indices2 = index_sorted[np.where(diff1 <= diff2, idx1, idx2)]
    return indices2

def searchsorted2(known_array, test_array):
    index_sorted = np.argsort(known_array)
    known_array_sorted = known_array[index_sorted]
    known_array_middles = known_array_sorted[1:] - np.diff(known_array_sorted.astype('f'))/2
    idx1 = np.searchsorted(known_array_middles, test_array)
    indices = index_sorted[idx1]
    return indices

def time_f(func_name):
    return timeit(func_name+"(known_array, test_array)",
        'from __main__ import known_array, test_array, ' + func_name, number=number)

print('Speedups:')
base_time = time_f('base')
for func_name in ['diffs', 'searchsorted1', 'searchsorted2']:
    print func_name + ' is x%.1f faster than base.' % (base_time / time_f(func_name))

Output:

Speedups:
diffs is x29.9 faster than base.
searchsorted1 is x37.4 faster than base.
searchsorted2 is x64.3 faster than base.
share|improve this answer
    
May you please give a sample code which conforms to the test data I have provided? –  Nipun Batra Dec 26 '13 at 8:26
    
The assertion fails when known_array is not sorted; eg. known_array = np.random.randint(0, 100, 100) test_array = np.random.randint(0, 100, 1000) –  Nipun Batra Dec 28 '13 at 4:42
    
I have added a Clarification section to the end of the question to illustrate the same –  Nipun Batra Dec 28 '13 at 5:15
    
Both searchsorted1 and searchsorted2 fail –  Nipun Batra Dec 29 '13 at 2:29
    
I removed the assert because it's not defined which value of known_array should be picked if more than one is the closest. –  cyborg Dec 29 '13 at 21:10

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