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I have this main function which takes 1 string and 2 callback functions as the argument. Below is the code.

function confirmYesNo(confirmMessage, confirmCallback, cancelCallback) {
    $("#yes-button").click(function () {
         confirmCallback(); //How do I pass confirmCallback arguments
    });
    ...
}

Here is how the function is invoked

function confirmYesNoTest() {
    var confirmContent = "Some Message"
    var id = "1";
    confirmYesNo(confirmContent,
        function (id) { alert(id); }, //alerts undefined
        function () { alert("Cancel Clicked"); });
}

The problem is that the id variable above (which is set to 1) comes out as "undefined" when the confirmCallback executes. Seems something related to scope, but I am not able to get this working.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The callback should not take any arguments. You could capture the id in a closure:

function confirmYesNoTest() {
    var confirmContent = "Some Message"
    var id = "1";
    confirmYesNo(
        confirmContent,
        function () { alert(id); },
        function () { alert("Cancel Clicked"); }
    );
}

Alternatively, if you didn't want to use closures you could pass the id as parameter to the callback:

function confirmYesNo(confirmMessage, id, confirmCallback, cancelCallback) {
    $("#yes-button").click(function () {
         confirmCallback(id);
    });
    ...
}

and when invoking:

function confirmYesNoTest() {
    var confirmContent = "Some Message"
    var id = "1";
    confirmYesNo(
        confirmContent,
        id,
        function (id) { alert(id); },
        function () { alert("Cancel Clicked"); }
    );
}

Now you can use the callbacks as named functions:

var confirmCallback = function(id) {
    alert(id);
};

and then:

function confirmYesNoTest() {
    var confirmContent = "Some Message"
    var id = "1";
    confirmYesNo(
        confirmContent,
        id,
        confirmCallback,
        function () { alert("Cancel Clicked"); }
    );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your first approach suits well, particularly when I don't know the exact number of parameters that will be required for the callback. I will be able to capture multiple parameters in closure as mentioned above without worrying about how many of these are there. – Jatin Dec 26 '13 at 8:40

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