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Is there a simple way of finding out the current value of a specified Vim setting? If I want to know the current value of, say tabstop, I can run:

:set tabstop

without passing an argument, and Vim will tell me the current value. This is fine for many settings, but it is no good for those that are either true or false. For example, if I want to find out the current value of expandtab, running:

:set expandtab

will actually enable expandtab. I just want to find out if it is enabled or not.

This sort of does what I want:

:echo &l:expandtab

but it seems quite verbose. Is there a quicker way?

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up vote 189 down vote accepted

Add a ? mark after the setting name and it will show the value

:set expandtab?
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6  
Note that the set <...>? syntax will work for "settings" that are options, but not for "settings" that are variables. So for example, to find out what the current syntax highlighting mode is (encoded in a variable, not an option), you need to do echo b:current_syntax. – Maxy-B Oct 12 '14 at 22:24
    
If you want to also see where the option was set from, use verbose. For this example, :verbose set expandtab. – mkobit Mar 19 at 19:08

Alternatively, the & symbol can be used to mean "option" - e.g.

let x = &expandtab
echo &expandtab
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There are also additional vim settings that can be displayed as well, such as:

:highlight

For the full list, see: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Displaying_the_current_Vim_environment

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This does not work. I wanted to check whether autowrite is on. :set autowrite? does the job. – Atcold Mar 31 at 18:17

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