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I recently wanted to publish my Jekyll site on Github pages, but it seems that putting everything in a subdirectory is giving some issues, even after I change the source to the correct directory.

My structure looks like this:

- site
   - src (contains all Jekyll stuff)
   - README.md
   - GruntFile.js
   - ...

Locally my site builds perfectly and when I go to http://localhost:4040 I can see it just nicely, but when I commit this to my Github and visit username.github.io I get a 404, if I go to username.github.io/src I can see part of my site, however all {% include %} are ignored.

In my _config.yml I updated the source: source: ./src, but that doesn't seem to help.

Is there a way to make Github Pages handle subdirectories properly? Basically I want to tell it that my Jekyll site is inside /src, and I want the url to just be username.github.io instead of username.github.io/src

I know i can use the pages branch and commit to there, but I would prefer if it could happen automaticly.

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1 Answer 1

up vote -1 down vote accepted

I contact Github support and they gave me 2 solutions.

  1. Move all my Jekyll source files to my top-lever directory.
  2. Use a different branch and update it manually each time.
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mgp asks: Woutr_be, thanks for your answer. I have the same problem. I understand point 1, but could you elaborate on point 2? Or point me to more info? Thank you for your help! –  Alice Feb 1 at 22:19
    
@Alice, basically Github allows you to create a branch called gh-pages, which, if it exists will use those files as your Github page. So when working with a different structure, you can manually push your compiled Jekyll site to that branch. Of course this is a bit of a hassle. –  woutr_be Feb 4 at 2:43

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