Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose an application sends a packet with TCP header to a server for a particular function, with its headers ethernet+IPv4+TCP. Is it possible to send the same packet with UDP header in which all data are the same? According to my knowledge, the receiver side will just de-multiplex the headers of the packet layer by layer so the data of the packet should be passed to the application layer of the server when the UDP header is de-multiplexed successfully. Is there any misconception?

share|improve this question
    
If you're asking "can I rewrite my application to use UDP instead of TCP?" then the answer is "yes". Of course, the characteristics of UDP are entirely different to those of TCP, so it's not a transparent change. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 11:37
    
If i am not going to rewrite the application but just edit the headers of the same packet and send it to the server, will it be accepted? –  Network study Dec 26 '13 at 11:40
    
Well, for a start, unless something is listening for UDP on the specified port, the packet will be dropped at the receiver. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 11:42
    
There are two ports opened for transmission of data in this application, TCP and UDP. However, the UDP one is not responsible for the transmission of the packet I mentioned above. I am thinking of sending that TCP packet with a correct UDP header through the UDP port, will it still be dropped? –  Network study Dec 26 '13 at 11:46
    
Then it depends on what the application does with data received over UDP. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If a server listens on a port no matter which protocol is in use, there sits some application logic on top, expecting certain data to arrive on this port.

As per your example if the server listens on two ports (A + B) it certainly expects a different kind of data on each of those two ports.

If the clinet now decides to switch ports, say send the data meant to go to port A to port B the server's application logic surely will get confused as it does not understand what it receives on port B and (if it's well designed software in the server) it will drop the connection on port B.

Such kind of scenario is completley independed of which kind of protocol is used.

It's the same as if you'd try to plug in the power cable of your pc into the network-socket but into the power-socket. Although both sockets are build into the PC you cannot simply use any socket for any kind of connection/transfer.

share|improve this answer

The receiver will not know which application to pass the data to, because no application is listening on the specified UDP port. The pacakge will be dropped.

share|improve this answer
    
what if UDP port is available but originally not for sending certain types of packet? –  Network study Dec 26 '13 at 11:48
    
What do you mean by available? Is there someone listening on the UDP port? Then it better not interferes with the TCP connection that uses the respective TCP port. Otherwise the Transmission Control part of the Transmission Control Protocol would be useless. –  Oswald Dec 26 '13 at 11:52
    
The application provides two ports for packet transmission TCP and UDP. The TCP one is direct delivery of data between the host and the server while the UDP one is for packet broadcasting (from 0.0.0.0:10000 to the server address). –  Network study Dec 26 '13 at 11:57

Suppose an application sends a packet with TCP header to a server for a particular function, with its headers ethernet+IPv4+TCP.

I can't suppose that. Applications don't send TCP packets. Applications send data. TCP sends TCP packets.

Is it possible to send the same packet with UDP header in which all data are the same?

Yes, of course, just send it via a UDP socket instead of a TCP socket, assuming the data fits into a UDP datagram.

According to my knowledge, the receiver side will just de-multiplex the headers of the packet layer by layer so the data of the packet should be passed to the application layer of the server when the UDP header is de-multiplexed successfully.

  1. There is no 'de-multiplexing' of headers. 2. If there is a UDP application at the server receiving on the UDP port you sent the data to, what you say will occur. If not, the transmission will be dropped.

Is there any misconception?

Not really, but you're misusing standard terminology, and ascribing powers to the application that really lie elsewhere. The application has nothing to do with Ethernet or TCP or UDP or IP headers.

I also have a strong feeling you are making a mountain out of a molehill.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.