Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there any efficient algorithm that allows to insert bit bit to position index when working with uint16_t? I've tried reading bit-by-bit after index, storing all such bits into array of char, changing bit at index, increasing index, and then looping again, iserting bits from array, but could be there a better way? So I know how to get, set, unset or toggle specific bit, but I suppose there could be better algorithm than processing bit-by-bit.

uint16_t bit_insert(uint16_t word, int bit, int index);
bit_insert(0b0000111111111110, 1, 1); /* must return 0b0100011111111111 */

P.S. The solution must be in pure ANSI-compatible C. I know that 0b prefix may be specific to gcc, but I've used it here to make things more obvious.

share|improve this question
1  
Why need a loop? Just shift all the adjacent bits at the same time. And what do you mean "insert" here and where do you count bits from? In your code you're inserting a 0 bit at index 0 but I see only new "1" bits in the result in both the left and right – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 26 '13 at 13:12
    
mea culpa; here should have been 1 as second argument, not zero. – ghostmansd Dec 26 '13 at 13:27

Use bitwise operators:

#define BIT_INSERT(word, bit, index)  \
    (((word) & (~(1U << (index)))) | ((bit) << (index)))
share|improve this answer
    
he means "insert", that is shift the remaining bits to the left, not assign bit to the bit at index, and he's counting bits from MSB – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 26 '13 at 13:59
    
@LưuVĩnhPhúc his question is not clear as is not clear the provided example, so I took it as: compute a value with bit value at bit position index and the other bits set to those of word. – ouah Dec 26 '13 at 14:17
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdint.h>

/* Insert a bit `idx' positions from the right (lsb). */
uint16_t
bit_insert_lsb(uint16_t n, int bit, int idx)
{
    uint16_t lower;

    if (idx > 15) {
        errno = ERANGE;
        return 0U;
    }

    /* Get bits 0 to `idx' inclusive. */
    lower = n & ((1U << (idx + 1)) - 1);

    return ((n & ~lower) | ((!!bit) << idx) | (lower >> 1));
}

/* Insert a bit `idx' positions from the left (msb). */
uint16_t
bit_insert_msb(uint16_t n, int bit, int idx)
{
    uint16_t lower;

    if (idx > 15) {
        errno = ERANGE;
        return 0U;
    }

    /* Get bits 0 to `16 - idx' inclusive. */
    lower = n & ((1U << (15 - idx + 1)) - 1);

    return ((n & ~lower) | ((!!bit) << (15 - idx)) | (lower >> 1));
}

Bits are typically counted from the right, where the least significant bit (lsb) resides, to the left, where the most significant bit (msb) is located. I allowed for insertion from either side by creating two functions. The one expected, according to the question, is bit_insert_msb.

Both functions perform a sanity check, setting errno to ERANGE and returning 0 if the value of idx is too large. I also provided some of C99's _Bool behaviour for the bit parameter in the return statements: 0 is 0 and any other value is 1. If you use a C99 compiler, I'd recommend changing bit's type to _Bool. You can then replace (!!bit) with bit directly.

I'd love to say it could be optimised, but that could very well make it less comprehensible.

Happy coding!

share|improve this answer

If you're counting bits from the left

mask = (1 << (16 - index + 1)) - 1;  // all 1s from bit "index" to LSB
// MSB of word (from left to index) | insert bit at index | LSB of word from (index-1)
word = (word & ~mask) | (bit << (16 - index)) | ((word & mask) >> 1);

There may be many ways more efficient but this way it's easy to understand

share|improve this answer
    
Try this with 0x8ffe instead of the example 0x0ffe. This doesn't work because when you use the ~ operator, you're accidentally turning on the sign bit in the mask, which will turn off the sign bit in the result. – Chrono Kitsune Dec 26 '13 at 16:52
1  
@ChronoKitsune typing mistake, what I thought is "-1", not "~" – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 27 '13 at 0:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.