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I have two arrays:-

int[] blueArray = new int[100];
int[] greenArray = new int[100];

greenArray and blueArray contain the a number between 0 and 255 to indicate the intensity of the respective color in each frame. So blueArray[0] has blue-value for frame-1 and blueArray[99] has blue-value for frame-100. Similar ordering applies for greenArray.

I wish to find out the top 10 frames with the highest cyan frames. So I am looking for the top 10 frame-ids that contain the highest sum of blue+green. I may not use additional data-structures and would like this top-10 list in O(n) time.

How can I accomplish this?

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edited the question to state blue+green. thanks. –  Mrinal Shukla Dec 26 '13 at 17:21
    
Where do you store your results? –  user1781290 Dec 26 '13 at 17:23
    
in any of the existing arrays (either greenArray or blueArray) –  Mrinal Shukla Dec 26 '13 at 17:27
1  
Then technically you could do 10 loops over the arrays to find the top result and swap it with the first element and for the next loop pretend your lists are actually starting one element later. While doing about 10 * n ops, this is technically O(n) –  user1781290 Dec 26 '13 at 17:30

2 Answers 2

While not really fast, this is actually O(n):

for (j = 0; j < 10; j++)
  max = j
  for (i = j + 1; i < 10; i++)
    if (blueArray[i] + greenArray[i] > blueArray[i] + greenArray[i])
      max = i;
  swap(blueArray[j], blueArray[max])
  swap(greenArray[j], greenArray[max])
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This is called partial sort. Wikipedia provides a nice overview of the available algorithms. The fact that you have to handle two arrays simultaneously shouldn't make a big difference, but it prevents you from using any existing implementation so you probably have to roll your own.

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