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How do you calculate a percentage from 2 int values into a int value that represents a percentage(perthousands for more accuracy)?

Background/purpose: using a processor that doesn't have a FPU, floating point computations take 100's of times longer.

int x = 25;
int y = 75;
int resultPercentage; // desire is 250 which would mean 25.0 percent

resultPercentage = (x/(x+y))*1000; // used 1000 instead of 100 for accuracy
printf("Result= ");
printf(resultPercentage);

output:

Result= 0

When really what I need is 250. and I can't use ANY Floating point computation.

Example of normal fpu computation:

int x = 25;
int y = 75;
int resultPercentage; // desire is 250 which would mean 25.0 percent

resultPercentage = (int)( ( ((double)x)/(double(x+y)) ) *1000); //Uses FPU slow

printf("Result= ");
printf(resultPercentage);

output:

Result= 250

But the output came at the cost of using floating point computations.

share|improve this question
    
Your brackets are in the wrong place. –  Martin James Dec 26 '13 at 17:38
    
@BLUEPIXY - you should move to answer & take the rep:) –  Martin James Dec 26 '13 at 17:39
    
You have to do the multiplication before division, because the fractions will be lost if you do the division first. –  Barmar Dec 26 '13 at 17:39
    
there will be always cases that you will need floting point like dividng 1 by 3 –  iCode4U Dec 26 '13 at 17:41
    
@user2997718: Not sure how that's relevant here? –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 17:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

resultPercentage = (x/(x+y))*1000; does not work as (x/(x+y)) is likely 0 or 1 before the multiplcation *1000 occurs. Instead:

For a rounded unsigned integer calculation of x/(x+y), let a = x and b = x+y then to find a/b use:

result = (a + b/2)/b;

For a rounded unsigned integer percent % calculation of a/b use

result = (100*a + b/2)/b;

For a rounded unsigned integer permil ‰ calculation of a/b use

result = (1000*a + b/2)/b;

For a rounded unsigned integer permyriad ‱ calculation of a/b use

result = (10000*a + b/2)/b;

@H2CO3 wells points out the concerns about eating up the integer range so using wider integers (long, long long) are needed for the multiplication and maybe x+y.

result = (100L*a + b/2)/b;

Of course, replace

// printf(resultPercentage);
printf("%d\n", resultPercentage);
share|improve this answer
    
i entered the values of 25 for a and 75 for b, and I end up with different results. (a+ b/2)/b = 0.8333 instead of a/(a+b) = 0.25, i'm not sure what you mean be the a/b stuff. –  Ashitakalax Dec 26 '13 at 21:48
    
@Ashitakalax a/b is representative of an integer divided by another integer. In your case a is x and b is x+y. In the percent (%) case, (100*a+ b/2)/b --> (100*25 + (25+75)/2)/(25+75) --> (2500 + 50)/100 --> 25550/100 --> 25. –  chux Dec 26 '13 at 22:39
    
Thanks @chux for the added description, that make more sense now. –  Ashitakalax Dec 26 '13 at 23:15
    
Good answer. I gave a "long division" alternative below which gets around the need for bigger types (which may not be supported on a machine with slow FP math) and gives the result as a string (which actually makes it faster than conventional FP math followed by sprintf). I think you would appreciate it... –  Floris Dec 28 '13 at 22:20

You could just write

(x * 1000 + 5) / (10 * (x + y))

if you care about correct rounding, and

(x * 100) / (x + y)

if you don't.


You are talking about "percentages", but I noticed that you are multiplying by 1000, which results in perthousands. If that's what you meant, then of course you'll need to change the multiplication factors to 10000 and 1000, respectively.

Furthermore, using integers significantly reduces the valid range of values to perform the computation on. This can be a bit widened if you force the intermediate results to be of a longer type, notably (signed or unsigned) long long:

(x * 1000ll + 5) / (10ll * (x + y))

should do the trick (due to integer promotion).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the added rounding factor –  Ashitakalax Dec 26 '13 at 17:41
    
Worth noting that this limits the maximum value of x... –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 17:42
    
@OliCharlesworth Yes, it does. If you know a better way of doing the computation without floating-point values, let me know. –  user529758 Dec 26 '13 at 17:42
1  
@H2CO3: I was going to suggest computing the intermediate result into a wider type. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 17:43
    
This is the right approach. However, this gives an integer percent, while OP actually wants integer tenths of a percent. –  Ted Hopp Dec 26 '13 at 17:43

A solution using long division

And now for the pencil-and-paper answer… Not sure if this will be faster than your processor's built in floating point arithmetic, but it's a fun thing to look at (and maybe improve upon). This is an implementation of long division (remember that?) - in principle it is "infinitely precise", a bit like BigDecimal math - in practice it is limited because a finite amount of space is allocated for the string (you could change that with a malloc/free). If you have trouble with (code) space on your processor (as well as the lack of a dedicated floating point unit) then this is definitely not the way to go; also I am assuming that all division (even integer) would be slow, and using only multiplication, addition and subtraction.

Final bonus - the result comes out as a string, saving the need for a separate printf style conversion later. There are many ways conceivable for speeding this up; for now it's just fun to see how you can solve this problem with only limited precision integers, yet get a "very good" answer. Incidentally, according to my pedestrian timing code, the result is faster than a divide-and-sprintf routine (which was pretty gratifying). Almost certainly due to the fact that the conversion to a string of digits is happening "almost for free" (if you think about how that is normally done, it takes lots of division/modulo math…).

EDIT in its current form, this code even takes account of rounding (computing one additional digit, and then making the necessary adjustments). One caveat: it only works for positive integers.

Play with it and tell me if you like it!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

void doRound(char *s, int n) {
  // round the number string in s
  // from the nth digit backwards.
  // first digit = #0
  int ii;
  int N = n;
  if(s[n] - '0' < 5) {
    s[N] = '\0';
    return; // remove last digit
  }
  while (n-- > 0) {
    if(s[n] == '.') {
      n--;
    }
    if(s[n] - '0' < 9) {
      s[n]++;
      s[N] = '\0';
      return;
    }
    s[n] = '0';
  }
  if (n == -1) {
    for (ii = N-1; ii >=0; ii--) {
     s[ii+1] = s[ii];
    }
    s[0] = '1';
  }
  else s[N] = '\0';
}

void longDivision(unsigned int a, unsigned int b, char* r, int n) {
// implement b / a using only integer add/subtract/multiply
  char temp[20];  // temporary location for result without decimal point
  char c = '0';   // current character (digit) of result
  int ci = 0;     // character index - location in temp where we write c
  int t = n + 1;  // precision - no more than n digits
  int dMult = 0;  // scale factor (log10) to be applied at the end
  int di = 0;

  // first get numbers to correct relative scaling:
  while( a > b) {
    dMult++;
    b *=10;
  }
  while (10 * a < b) {
    dMult --;
    a*=10;
  }

  // now a >= b: find first digit with addition and subtraction only
  while( b > a ) {
    c++;
    b -= a;
  }
  t--;
  temp[ci++] = c; // copy first digit
  c = '0';

  // now keep going; stop when we hit required number of digits
  while( b > 0 && t > 0) {
    b *= 10;
    t--;
    while( b > a ) {
      c++;
      b -= a;
    }
    temp[ ci++ ] = c;
    c = '0';
  }

  // copy the result to the output string:
  temp[ ci ] = '\0'; // terminate temp string
  if (dMult > 0) {
    r[ di++ ] = '0';
    r[ di++ ] = '.';
    while( --dMult > 0 ) {
      r[ di++ ] = '0';
    }
    ci = 0;
    while( temp[ ci ] != '\0' ) {
     r[ di++ ] = temp[ ci++ ];
    }
  }
  else {
    ci = 0;
    while( temp[ ci ] != '\0') {
      r[ di++ ] = temp[ ci++ ];
      if( dMult++ == 0 ) r[ di++ ] = '.';
    }
  }
  r[ di ] = '\0';

  // finally, do rounding:
  doRound(r, n+1);

}


int main(void) {
  int a, b;
  time_t startT, endT;
  char result[20];
  int ii;

  a = 123; b = 700;
  longDivision(a, b, result, 5);
  printf("the result of %d / %d is %s\n", b, a, result);

  printf("the actual result with floating point is %.5f\n", (float) b / (float) a );

  a = 7; b = 7000;
  longDivision(a, b, result, 5);
  printf("the result of %d / %d is %s\n", b, a, result);

  a = 3000; b = 29999999;
  longDivision(a, b, result, 5);
  printf("the result of %d / %d is %s\n", b, a, result);

  startT = clock();
  for(ii = 1; ii < 100000; ii++) longDivision(a, ii, result, 5);
  endT = clock();
  printf("time taken: %.2f ms\n", (endT - startT) * 1000.0 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);
  // and using floating point:
  startT = clock();
  for(ii = 1; ii < 100000; ii++) sprintf(result, "%.4f", (float) ii / (float) a);
  endT = clock();
  printf("with floating point, time taken: %.2f ms\n", (endT - startT) * 1000.0 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC);
  return 0;
}

The result (without optimization turned on):

the result of 700 / 123 is 5.6911
the actual result with floating point is 5.69106
the result of 7000 / 7 is 1000.00
the result of 29999999 / 3000 is 10000.0
time taken: 16.95 ms
with floating point, time taken: 35.97 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Nice for a fast textual solution to any precision desired. Would be nifty if it rounded (56.911 v. 56.910), but that gets hard when near a power of 10. –  chux Dec 28 '13 at 22:52
    
@chux - to round, you would have to compute one more digit, then "work back" one. But as you say, if the number was 9.99999 it gets a bit messy... –  Floris Dec 28 '13 at 22:53
    
@chux - just for you: solution with rounding implemented… Not that it will get me any additional rep, I'm sure. –  Floris Dec 29 '13 at 0:07

Why dont you use

resultPercentage = (x*1000)/(x+y);
share|improve this answer
1  
Bear in mind that this limits the maximum value of x that is supported. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 26 '13 at 17:40

A slight modification of expression can do the trick. Like in this case :

resultPercentage = (x*1000)/(x+y); should do the job.

share|improve this answer

try this:

int x = 25;
int y = 75;
int resultPercentage; // desire is 250 which would mean 25.0 percent

resultPercentage = (x*1000)/(x+y);

printf("Result= ");
printf(resultPercentage);
share|improve this answer
    
What's the cast to an int for? –  Ted Hopp Dec 26 '13 at 17:44
    
not needed, i forgot it.. will edit. –  T McKeown Dec 26 '13 at 17:45

If your requirement is just to find a value which gives the relation between two numbers then instead of using 1000 you may use 1024

The multiplication with 1000 will take several cycles but instead you may use

resultRelation = (x<<10)/(x+y);

It will take only 10 cycle for multiplication. Even the result will not have very large variation with 1000. After you find the percentage you may be doing some thresholding with the percentage you got, just change the comparing values.

Suppose you are using

if(resultPercentage > 500) do something

instead of that use

if(resultRelation > 512) do something

This way you can find the corresponding mapped values and replace it with them. If you are very strict on both cycles and accuracy then go for a saved lookup table which converts 0-1024 into 0-1000 but it uses a lot of RAM

share|improve this answer

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