Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am looking for a solution to count the number of occurrences of different strings in a single line using unix commands.

Say, I have a file x.log and the contents within the file are:

2013.12.25 Can you provide me a solution to the question
Hello World how are you
2013.12.25 Can I ask a question
2013.12.26 Can you provide me a solution to the question
Hello World how are you
2013.12.26 Can I ask a question

The command should count the number of occurrences of the strings "Can" and "question" and provide me the output

2013.12.25 4
2013.12.26 4
share|improve this question
    
Are the lines in x.log already sorted by the first field? – Mark Plotnick Dec 26 '13 at 19:11
    
Yes, they are written according to the date. – user3137403 Dec 26 '13 at 19:17
tr -s ' ' '\n' < file | sort | uniq -c | sort -n

The tr converts all spaces into newlines. This will give you one word per line. Then we sort it and pipe it though uniq to get a frequency count and finally, we sort by frequencies.

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated the answer but I really think the whole thing is self explanatory to someone who's familiar with basic UNIX and willing to read the manual pages for the commands in the pipeline. – Noufal Ibrahim Dec 26 '13 at 18:45
    
Downvote removed (as promised). If everyone knew "basic UNIX", this question wouldn't have been asked and therefore no answer would have been necessary, right? So clearly asking the question (and posting an answer to it) should be intended for those who don't know basic UNIX. :-) Also, see this meta post – Ken White Dec 26 '13 at 19:54
    
That's debatable but I don't want to get into a xkcd.com/386 – Noufal Ibrahim Dec 27 '13 at 8:36

awk is a good fit for queries like this.

  • for each line in the first file (using the NR==FNR idiom), the script stores the word (I assume one word per line) as one of the indexes of the wordlist array.
  • for each line in the second file, it increments the count array (indexed by the first field of each line) for each field (excluding the first field, of course) that matches any word in wordlist.
  • at the end, it prints out the count array

[I looked at your unedited question to verify that each Hello World line was actually supposed to be part of the previous line.]

$ cat wordlist
Can
question
$ cat x.log
2013.12.25 Can you provide me a solution to the question Hello World how are you
2013.12.25 Can I ask a question
2013.12.26 Can you provide me a solution to the question Hello World how are you
2013.12.26 Can I ask a question
$ cat count.awk 
{    if (NR == FNR) {
        wordlist[$1]
    } else {
        for (f=2; f<=NF; f++) {
            if ($f in wordlist) count[$1]++
        }
    }
}
END {
    for (c in count) {
        print c, count[c]
    }
}
$ awk -f count.awk wordlist x.log
2013.12.25 4
2013.12.26 4
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.