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I want to display a link in a mobile menu that is hidden in the regular page navigation. I removed the “Home” navigation link

<li id="home-menu"><a href="./index.html">HOME</a> </li>

from the regular webpage view in styles.css Line 60, using an alternative to display:none, discussed here: http://css-tricks.com/places-its-tempting-to-use-display-none-but-dont.

#home-menu {
  position: absolute;                           
  overflow: hidden; 
  clip: rect(0 0 0 0);                         
  height: 1px; width: 1px; 
  margin: -1px; padding: 0; border: 0;          
}

Now, I want to enable the "Home" link in the mobile menu list. On Line 176 of styles.css, I tried to display #home-menu,

#home-menu {
display: inline-block;
}

but it will not show in the responsive menu. I am really trying to avoid using !important. I would appreciate learning how to resolve this. My example is at http://nspowers.org/ask/display/

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have a lot going on here, so without going into too much detail I'll suggest a cleaner alternative:

Remove the absolute positioning and its associated rules and instead use display: none; to hide #home-menu initially - then add display: block; at the mobile break point to have it re-appear:

header#topnav nav ul li#home-menu {
    display: none; /* Also remove the !important rule from here */
    /* position: absolute;                           
    overflow: hidden; 
    clip: rect(0 0 0 0);                         
    height: 1px; width: 1px; 
    margin: -1px; */
    padding: 0; border: 0; 
}

To have home re-appear for smaller devices:

@media only screen and (max-width: 579px) {
   header#topnav nav ul li#home-menu {
       display: block; 
   }
}

This seems like a simpler more maintainble solution, plus you won't need to override so many rules.


Read up on selector specificity if you're confused about how it works - see: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-selectors/#specificity, http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2007/07/27/css-specificity-things-you-should-know/ and https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/Specificity for more.

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1  
Unless the OP has a very specific reason for using all the other styles, this is a great suggestion. –  brouxhaha Dec 26 '13 at 19:28
    
@Adrift Thank you for providing the CSS specificity resources. I am studying them and they are enhancing my understanding of how CSS works. I learned about specificity conflicts and with the revised CSS it works great! Thank you for taking the time to explain and I hope I can develop the skills to assist future questions. –  Nathan Dec 26 '13 at 22:54

You're clipping it and have a height and width of 1px, so you need to override these properties as well:

#topnav nav ul li {
    float: none;
    margin: 0;
    clip: auto; //reset clip to not clip
    height: auto; //allow height to expand
    width: 100%; //matches rest of menu elements
    position: relative; //allow to flow above rest of elements instead of overlap first one
}

You also have this at line 117, which is overriding your display: inline-block because of the specificity of the selectors you are using. You can see this in the developer tools:

#topnav nav ul li {
    display: block;
    float: left;
    font-size: 1.7em;
    margin-right: 30px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate you looking at this too. Your response helped me understand how some elements override others and enabled me to resolve the question. –  Nathan Dec 26 '13 at 22:55

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