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This is my problem: I am reading in about 3 million rows and 100 columns in chunks of 100,000 rows using the "fread" function. For each chunk of data, I am doing some organizing the data set, extracting some rows applying certain conditions (e.g. species name = dog, Julian date range is x to y, population range is less than z etc), then writing out to a csv file with select columns (say 10 instead of all the 100) for each chunk so I can access the file later on. I will have a function specific to each species. I tried writing a function in the following way so that I can use it in the loop which I use for reading the 3 million records in chunks.

Assume DF1 is the data frame for the 1st 100,000 row chunk with 100 columns.

dog.1 <- function(){
#Creating vectors for each of the 10 columns
stdate <- DF1$V8
spcdog <- DF1$23
.
.
.
NDF1 <- data.frame(stdate,spcdog, ........)
}

When I call this function, I am expecting vectors (stdate, spcdog .....) and data.frame "NDF1" to be created. I know the vectors and data frame is created, but apparently I am losing all variables created within the function after it closes. How should I get around this issue? I want to retain the data frame only.

I appreciate any help in advance.

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1  
I cannot follow you descriptions, but a function needs a return value and doesn't return anything else. Read help("function"). Objects created inside a function only exist in the function's environment. –  Roland Dec 26 '13 at 19:02
    
I understand that and wanted to find out if there's a way that I can retain the values/objects that are generated within the function. –  user2653586 Jan 6 at 19:48
    
The recommended way is to return everything you want to access outside a function in a list. –  Roland Jan 6 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to capture the value from that function:

dog.1 <- function(){
  #Creating vectors for each of the 10 columns
  stdate <- DF1$V8
  spcdog <- DF1$V23   # oops ... cannot have variables named with just numerals

  data.frame(stdate,spcdog)
}

NDF1 <- dog.1()

I wouldn't have done it that way, but I think what is happening is that your efforts may be error free, but the results are not being assigned to a name. The NDF1 object was being created but then lost as soon as the function call was completed because it only existed inside the function environment. Unlike the other commenters I think you should seen seen a result if your version were called. But maybe the lack of a test case is preventing me from seeing my error in understanding. Wouldn't be the first time.

DF <- data.frame(V8 = 1:10, V23=letters[1:10], V24 = letters[11:20])
  dog.1 <- function(){
  #Creating vectors for each of the 10 columns
  stdate <- DF1$V8
  spcdog <- DF1$V23   # oops ... cannot have variables named with just numerals

  data.frame(stdate,spcdog)
}

dog.1 <- function(){
  stdate <- DF$V8
  spcdog <- DF$V23   

  data.frame(stdate,spcdog)
}

NDF1 <- dog.1()
dog.1()
   stdate spcdog
1       1      a
2       2      b
3       3      c
4       4      d
5       5      e
6       6      f
7       7      g
8       8      h
9       9      i
10     10      j
> str(NDF1)
'data.frame':   10 obs. of  2 variables:
 $ stdate: int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 $ spcdog: Factor w/ 10 levels "a","b","c","d",..: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

I was wrong about the version with <- as the final function call. I thought that <- would return the value of the RHS of the assignment but apparently it does not. Nonetheless the function would "work" in the sense that using it on the RHS of an assignment would succeed:

> dog.1 <- function(){
+   stdate <- DF$V8
+   spcdog <- DF$V23   
+   XYZ <- data.frame(stdate,spcdog)
+ }
> NDF1 <- dog.1()
> str(NDF1)   # success
'data.frame':   10 obs. of  2 variables:
 $ stdate: int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 $ spcdog: Factor w/ 10 levels "a","b","c","d",..: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
> dog.1()
> # no screen output
> # But if you used .Last.value you would see the data.frame
> # So we know that the data.frame is being returned but it
> # is being returned invisibly.
> .Last.value
   stdate spcdog
1       1      a
2       2      b
3       3      c
4       4      d
5       5      e
6       6      f
7       7      g
8       8      h
9       9      i
10     10      j
share|improve this answer
    
No there shouldn't be anything visible from the OPs version. The data.frame is still being returned by it's being returned invisibly so if you don't assign it to something you won't see it after the function is called. You could still access it with .Last.value though. –  Dason Dec 26 '13 at 19:23
    
Well, I still don't agree. Posting counter-example. Err ... well it wasn't exactly a counter-example was it. Apologies. –  BondedDust Dec 26 '13 at 19:24
    
Nope - not a counter example to what I was saying. –  Dason Dec 26 '13 at 19:29
1  
You edit isn't quite correct. It does return the value of the right hand of the assignment - but it does so invisibly. Like I said you can access it with .Last.value after the function call to see that that happens. The easiest way though is to actually store the value at the time of the function call. –  Dason Dec 26 '13 at 19:32
    
Thanks. I was pretty sure something was being returned (as indicated by the success of the illustrated assignment operation.) –  BondedDust Dec 26 '13 at 20:39

as Roland said, you should use a return value.

Thus, try to eliminate "NDF1 <-", then you should see at least some output (I have no info to say if it'll be correct or not)

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1  
Technically you don't need to eliminate the last assignment - that value is still getting returned from the function. It's just not being saved afterward. But if the whole goal is to return it the assignment at the end is pointless. –  Dason Dec 26 '13 at 19:21
    
yes, you are right. I was just suggesting a quick way to make the output coming from the last step of the code visible. –  Davide Passaretti Dec 26 '13 at 19:30
    
R trivia: when a function returns a value invisibly, encapsulate it in parentheses to force the print method. E.g. foo(x) returns something invisibly; (foo(x)) will cause the result to be printed to the console. But as everyone says, if you want to store the result in an object, you need to assign the function via bar<-foo(x) . –  Carl Witthoft Dec 26 '13 at 21:18
    
Moving NDF1 out of the function and using "NDF1 <- functionname()" worked for me. Thanks. –  user2653586 Jan 15 at 16:44

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