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I'm putting together a sample application to learn Scala. I'm at the point of attempting to get a grasp on the type system. The case here is attempting to build a trait family to handle object serialization.

I've read on types, generics, manifests, bounds, and variance, but seem to be suffering from holiday hangover syndrome and am unable to construct the proper structure.

// E is the encoded data, while D is the decoded data. E will be static at
// each impl trait (they return at string, bytes, or some other fixed type),
// while D type is call-specific.
abstract trait Serialization[E] {
  def serialize[D](payload: D): E
  def deserialize[D](payload: E): D
}

// Jackson (JSON). The E type will always be a String.
trait JsonSerialization[E] extends Serialization {
  val mapper = new ObjectMapper() with ScalaObjectMapper

  def serialize[D](payload: D) = mapper.writeValueAsString(payload)
  def deserialize[D](payload: E) = mapper.readValue[D](payload)
}

// XStream (XML). E will always be a String.
trait XmlSerialization[E] extends Serialization {
  val xstream = new XStream()

  def serialize[D](payload: D) = xstream.toXML(payload)
  def deserialize[D](payload: E) = xstream.fromXML(payload).asInstanceOf[D] 
}  

And sample use..

val encoder = new {} with XmlSerialization[String]
val xml = encoder.serialize(List(1,2,3))
val lst = encoder.deserialize(xml)

Obviously the above is not syntactically correct, but I hope it conveys the intent of what I'm trying to accomplish.

I appreciate the patience for this scala newbie.

:: Update ::

abstract trait Serialization[E] {
  def serialize[D](payload: D): E
  def deserialize[D](payload: E)(implicit m: Manifest[D]): D
}

trait JsonSerialization extends Serialization[String] {
  val mapper = new ObjectMapper() with ScalaObjectMapper

  def serialize[D](payload: D) = mapper.writeValueAsString(payload)
  def deserialize[D](payload: String)(implicit m: Manifest[D]) = mapper.readValue[D](payload)
}

This works in several test cases.

abstract class SerializationSpec[T] extends BaseSpec {
  val implementation: Serialization[T]

  "Serialization implementation" should "serialize and deserialize basic types" in {
    val original = List(1,2,3)
    val encoded = implementation.serialize(original)
    val decoded = implementation.deserialize[List[Int]](encoded)

    original shouldBe decoded
  }
}

class JsonSerializationSpec extends SerializationSpec[String] {
  case class MockJsonSerialization() extends JsonSerialization
  val implementation = MockJsonSerialization()
}

Anything i'm overlooking for solution, here?

share|improve this question
    
If in JsonSerialization and XmlSerialization, E is always String, then why do you have E still as a type parameter? Why not trait JsonSerialization extends Serialization[String]? –  Jesper Dec 26 '13 at 19:20
    
And if JsonSerialization and XmlSerialization have implementations, why not make them classes instead of traits? Then you can do new XmlSerialization instead of new {} with XmlSerialization. –  Jesper Dec 26 '13 at 19:23
    
@Jesper - You are correct on the first point. As for the second point, I also expect to be able to use the "implementation" traits as mix-ins to other classes. –  Franco Gasperino Dec 26 '13 at 19:39
    
The most common way to instantiate just a trait would be to instantiate an anonymous subclass with an empty implementation: new JsonSerialization {} –  Bob Dec 26 '13 at 21:23
1  
What is the question exactly? –  0__ Dec 27 '13 at 15:16

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