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I'm writing something that needs to start with a list of numbers, already in order but possibly with gaps, and find the first gap, fill in a number in that gap, and return the number it filled in. The numbers are integers on the range [0, inf). I have this, and it works perfectly:

list<int> TestList = {0, 1, 5, 6, 7};

int NewElement;
if(TestList.size() == 0)
{
    NewElement = 0;
    TestList.push_back(NewElement);
}
else
{
    bool Selected = false;
    int Previous = 0;
    for(auto Current = TestList.begin(); Current != TestList.end(); Current++)
    {
        if(*Current > Previous + 1)
        {
            NewElement = Previous + 1;
            TestList.insert(Current, NewElement);
            Selected = true;
            break;
        }
        Previous = *Current;
    }
    if(!Selected)
    {
        NewElement = Previous + 1;
        TestList.insert(TestList.end(), NewElement);
    }
}

But I'm worried about efficiency, since I'm using an equivalent piece of code to allocate uniform block binding locations in OpenGL behind a class wrapper I wrote (but that isn't exactly relevant to the question :) ). Any suggestions to improve the efficiency? I'm not even sure if std::list is the best choice for it.

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1  
This is absolutely fine. std::list is a good choice here if the lists can be long, because insertions are O(1) vs. O(n) for std::vector, although for short lists std::vector might nevertheless be faster due to its lower constant factor. –  j_random_hacker Dec 26 '13 at 23:01
    
Cool, I may go with std::vector because I won't have too many of these allocated at a given time. However, I'm also sure this snippet will come in handy sometime haha –  mebob Dec 26 '13 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some suggestions:

  • Try other containers and compare. A linked list may have good theoretical properties, but the real-life benefits of contiguous storage, such as in a sorted vector, can be dramatic.

  • Since your range is already ordered, you can perform binary search to find the gap: Start in the middle, and if the value there is equal to half the size, there's no gap, so you can restrict searching to the other half. Rinse and repeat. (This assumes that there are no repeated numbers in the range, which I suppose is a reasonable restriction given that you have a notion of "gap".)

    This is more of a theoretical, separate suggestion. A binary search on a pure linked list cannot be implemented very efficiently, so a different sort of data structure would be needed to take advantage of this approach.

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What's the best way to access middle element quickly for the binary search? –  mebob Dec 26 '13 at 23:10
1  
@mebob: Random access at size() / 2? (You need a container with random access, of course. Or build your own tree structure.) –  Kerrek SB Dec 26 '13 at 23:11
    
@mebob std::list has a bidirectional iterator. So that to get the middle iterator you should sequantially increase the beginning iterator using either standard function std::next or standard function std::advance. –  Vlad from Moscow Dec 26 '13 at 23:13
    
@VladfromMoscow Would that be faster than simply iterating through the whole list? I feel like iterating to the middle and potentially iterating backwards will just add overhead in my particular case. –  mebob Dec 26 '13 at 23:19
1  
@mebob: No, I added a sentence about that; a linked list cannot be searched efficiently. –  Kerrek SB Dec 26 '13 at 23:21

Some suggestions:

  • A cursor gap structure (a.k.a. “gap buffer”) based on std::vector is probably the fastest (regardless of system) for this. For the implementation, set the capacity at the outset (known from the largest number) so as to avoid costly dynamic allocations.

  • Binary search can be employed on a cursor gap structure, with then fast block move to move the insertion point, but do measure if you go this route: often methods that are bad for a very large number of items, such as linear search, turn out to be best for a small number of items.

  • Retain the position between calls, so you don't have to start from the beginning each time, reducing the total algorithmic complexity for filling in all, from O(n2) to O(n).


Update: based on the OP’s additional commentary information that this is a case of allocating and deallocating numbers, where the order (apparently) doesn't matter, the fastest is probably to use a free list, as suggested in a comment by j_random_hacker. Simply put, at the outset push all available numbers onto a stack, e.g. a std::stack, the free-list. To allocate a number simply pop it off the stack (choosing the number at top of the stack), to deallocate a number simply push it.

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I'm not trying to fill them all in, I'm actually just using it to allocate numbers from the list (something for OpenGL buffers). The list holds all the numbers in use, and there may be different gaps at different calls. However, I think I may use something based on std::vector since I won't have a large number of numbers in there at a given time. –  mebob Dec 26 '13 at 23:17
    
oh, allocation. then maybe there is also -- deallocation? changes the picture dramatically. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 26 '13 at 23:21
    
@mebob: If you call this function k times in a row without calling the equivalent deallocation function in between, then you're doing O(kn) work, when using Alf's "start where we left off" approach you'd only be doing O(k + n). –  j_random_hacker Dec 26 '13 at 23:22
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf Deallocation simply boils down to iterating through till I find the element I'm deallocating, and removing it, since there should only be one of each number in the list --- that is, if my allocation function works as I intend haha. –  mebob Dec 26 '13 at 23:29
1  
@mebob: Maybe. But is it critical that you always return the lowest free number? If it would suffice to simply return any free number, then a much simpler and more efficient solution exists: just have the deallocation function push the deallocated number onto a stack, and make the allocation function try to pop from this stack. If it's empty, then increment maxNumberSeenSoFar and return it. –  j_random_hacker Dec 26 '13 at 23:46

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