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You can dynamically define a class method for a class like so:

class Foo
end

bar = %q{def bar() "bar!" end}
Foo.instance_eval(bar)

But how do you do the opposite: remove/undefine a class method? I suspect Module's remove_method and undef_method methods might be able to be used for this purpose, but all of the examples I've seen after Googling for hours have been for removing/undefining instance methods, not class methods. Or perhaps there's a syntax you can pass to instance_eval to do this as well.

Thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/ruby1.8

class Foo

  def Foo.bar
    puts "bar"
  end

end

Foo.bar    # => bar

class <<Foo
  remove_method :bar
end

Foo.bar    # => undefined method `bar' for Foo:Class (NoMethodError)

When you define a class method like Foo.bar, Ruby puts it Foo's eigenclass. Ruby can't put it in Foo, because then it would be an instance method. Ruby creates Foo's eigenclass (aka "singleton class"), sets the superclass of the eigenclass to Foo's superclass, and then sets Foo's superclass to the eigenclass:

Foo -------------> Foo(eigenclass) -------------> Object
        super      def bar             super

That's why we have to open up Foo's eigenclass using class <<Foo to remove method bar.

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Bingo. Thanks Wayne! –  Brian Ploetz Jan 17 '10 at 2:01
1  
I would have thought it'd be possible without using the Eigenclass, at least in 1.9. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 27 '11 at 23:28
    
@Andrew, Perhaps so. Alas, I do not know it. –  Wayne Conrad Jun 28 '11 at 14:12
    
This didn't work for me in Ruby1.9.3. I was still able to call the removed method. –  joseph.hainline Jan 27 at 5:13
    
@joseph.hainline - That's interesting! I just confirmed that the above works in MRI 1.8.3-p374, MRI 1.9.3-p484, MRI 2.0.0-p247, and MRI 2.1.0. Are you perhaps doing something different, either when removing the method, or when calling it, or perhaps using a non-MRI Ruby? –  Wayne Conrad Jan 31 at 2:58

This also works for me (not sure if there are differences between undef and remove_method):

class Foo
end

Foo.instance_eval do
  def color
    "green"
  end
end

Foo.color # => "green"

Foo.instance_eval { undef :color }

Foo.color # => NoMethodError: undefined method `color' for Foo:Class
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This worked for me. I called it on an object, and it only removed it at the object level. Foo.new.instance_eval { undef :color } works too. –  Marcel Valdez Orozco Jul 8 '12 at 22:48

I guess I can't comment on Adrian's answer because I don't have enough cred, but his answer helped me.

What I found: undef seems to completely remove the method from existence, while remove_method removes it from that class, but it will still be defined on superclasses or other modules that have been extened on this class, etc.

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Object.send(:remove_const, :Foo)

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1  
Doesn't that remove the whole class? –  Adrian Macneil Mar 28 '12 at 0:20
    
yes, it will remove class Foo –  edikgat Oct 18 '13 at 13:38

If you would like to remove method with name what calculate dinamically, you should use eigenclasses like:

class Foo
  def self.bar
    puts "bar"
  end
end

name_of_method_to_remove = :bar
eigenclass = class << Foo; self; end
eigenclass.class_eval do
  remove_method name_of_method_to_remove
end

this way is better than others answers, becouse here i used class_eval with block. As you now block see current namespace, so you could use your variables to remove methods dinamically

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