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Originally I uses an scikit-learn snipit to generate my data set:

# Create a random dataset
rng = np.random.RandomState(1)
X = np.sort(5 * rng.rand(80, 1), axis=0)
y = np.sin(X).ravel()
y[::5] += 3 * (0.5 - rng.rand(16))

I then switched to a .csv file:

"X", "Y" -0.8,7.2 -0.7,6.9 0.4,6.4 2.5,6 2.9,5.8 3.2,5.8 3.6,5.6 3.9,4.7 4.2,5.8 4.3,5.2 5.4,4.9 6,4.9

So now I thought I would read in the csv and draw a plot:

import csv
import numpy as np

#dataset
# read in the data as rows 
with open('my.csv', 'rb') as csvfile: 
h_reader = csv.reader( csvfile, delimiter =',',quotechar ='"') 

    # First row contains feature names 
    feature_names = _reader.next() 

    X, y = [], []
    for row in _reader: 
    X.append(row[0]) 
    y.append(row[1]) 

feature_names = np.array(feature_names) 
X      = np.array( X) 
y      = np.array( y)

print type(X)
print type(y)

# Fit regression model
from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestRegressor
rfr_1 = RandomForestRegressor(n_estimators=10, max_depth=2)
rfr_2 = RandomForestRegressor(n_estimators=10, max_depth=5)
print X
print y

rfr_1.fit(X, y)
rfr_2.fit(X, y)

# Predict
X_test = np.arange(0.0, 5.0, 0.01)[:, np.newaxis]
y_1  = rfr_1.predict(X_test)
y_2  = rfr_2.predict(X_test)

# Plot the results
import pylab as pl
pl.figure()
pl.scatter(X, y, c="k", label="data")
pl.plot(X_test, y_1, c="g", label="max_depth=2", linewidth=2)
pl.plot(X_test, y_2, c="r", label="max_depth=5", linewidth=2)
pl.xlabel("X")
pl.ylabel("Y")
pl.title("Regression")
pl.legend()
pl.show()

I get the following output when I was expecting a chart:

<type 'numpy.ndarray'>
<type 'numpy.ndarray'>
['-0.8' '-0.7' '0.4' '2.5' '2.9' '3.2' '3.6' '3.9' '4.2' '4.3' '5.4' '6'
 '6' '6' '6.2' '6.3' '6.9' '7' '7.4' '7.5' '7.5' '7.6' '8' '8.5' '9.1']
['7.2' '6.9' '6.4' '6' '5.8' '5.8' '5.6' '4.7' '5.8' '5.2' '4.9' '4.9'
 '4.3' '4.4' '4.5' '4.6' '3.7' '3.9' '4.2' '4' '3.9' '3.5' '4' '3.6' '3.1']
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "test3.py", line 33, in <module>
rfr_1.fit(X, y)
File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/scikit_learn-0.14.1-py2.7-linux- 
i686.egg    /sklearn/ensemble/forest.py", line 260, in fit
n_samples, self.n_features_ = X.shape
ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack

What am I doing wrong when reading in the .csv from generating the dataset?

thanks!

share|improve this question
    
try X = np.array( X ).T instead of X = np.array( X ) –  behzad.nouri Dec 27 '13 at 2:02
    
I noticed my "generated output" in a different format. My .csv data set should be transformed into a format such as X = [[ -0.8] [ -0.7] ... [ 9.1]] y = [7.2 6.9 6.4 6 ... 3.6 3.1]. converted data to float but an not sure how to format X –  Chris Rigano Dec 27 '13 at 2:04
    
Hi behzad.nouri, no effect; I appreciate any suggestions! –  Chris Rigano Dec 27 '13 at 2:08
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2 Answers

You need to convert X and y into correct float type and resize the shape of X into the right dimension.

I notice that the dimension of X is (80, 1) in your random dataset but the output of X's length is 25.

Besides, I see that you use numpy in your code, so you can save and load file by numpy with a more compact codes like this without using the csv module.

*Save generated data

# Create a random dataset
......
np.savetxt("my.csv", np.column_stack((X,y)), delimiter=",")

*Load data

# load data
data = np.loadtxt("my.csv", delimiter=",")
X = np.resize(data[:, 0], (80, 1)) 
y = data[:, 1]    

# Fit regression model
......
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Used float to convert to correct type

X = X.astype(float) y = y.astype(float)

and np.resize to match the required array dimensions

X = np.resize(X,(25,1))

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