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I'm creating 3 tables.

<table id="first">
    <tr>
        <td>
        1. CAPTION
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table id="second">
                <tr>
                    <td>
                        2. CAPTION
                    </td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                    <td>
                        <img src="" width="100" height="100" />
                    </td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <table id="third">
                <tr>
                    <td>
                        3. CAPTION
                    </td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                    <td>
                        <img src="" width="100" height="100" />
                    </td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

I want to add 10px padding (padding-top:10px) for the main table td elements.

#first tr td
{
    padding-top: 10px;
    padding-left: 0pt;
}

But this padding is adding to inner tables td elements.

alt text

How can i prevent to pass padding-top setting to the inner tables?

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Use #first > tr > td.

It means "a td that is a direct child of a tr that is a direct child of an element with ID 'first'".

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It's worth noting that this doesn't work in Internet Explorer 6 (just in case you have to support it). – Phil Ross Jan 16 '10 at 23:31
    
But there is no change, when i add "border:10px solid blue;" to the "#first > tr > td" . – uzay95 Jan 16 '10 at 23:32
    
Support with what for IE 6? – uzay95 Jan 16 '10 at 23:33
    
"Support it" meaning that your website looks "right" in IE6. – Zack The Human Jan 16 '10 at 23:55
    
IE6 doesn't support E > F? Lame. – Nicolás Jan 16 '10 at 23:57

There are 2 solutions.

One (the hard way), Specify padding values to the inner child elements so that it over-rides the parent style specifications.

Two (the above method), Use '#first > tr > td' but, it leads to cross browser comparability issues.

ie-6 does have a large share of the browser market.

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