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It seems that checking isinstance(..., io.IOBase) is the 'correct' way to determine if an object is 'file-like'.

However, when defining my own file-like class, it doesn't seem to work:

import io

class file_like():

    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def write(self, line):
        print("Written:", line)

    def close(self):
        pass

    def flush(self):
        pass

print(isinstance(file_like(), io.IOBase))
# Prints 'False'

How can I make it work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Checking isinstance(something, io.IOBase) only checks ifsomethingis an instance of io.IOBase or a class derived from it -- so I don't know where you got the idea that it's the 'correct' way to determine if an object is 'file-like'.

A different way to do it is with an Abstract Base Class. Python has a number of built-in ones, but currently doesn't have one for 'file-like' that could used withisinstance(). However you can define your own by using theabcmodule as outlined in PEP 3119.

The Python Module of the Week webiste has a good explanation of using theabcmodule to do things like as this. And this highly rated answer to the question Correct way to detect sequence parameter? shows a similar way of defining your own ABC.

To illustrate applying it to your case, you could define an ABC like this with all its methods abstract -- thereby forcing derived classes to define all of them in order to be instantiated:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class ABCFileLike(metaclass=ABCMeta):
    @abstractmethod
    def __init__(self): pass

    @abstractmethod
    def write(self, line): pass

    @abstractmethod
    def close(self): pass

    @abstractmethod
    def flush(self): pass

You could then derive your own concrete classes from it, making sure to supply implementations of all the abstract methods. (If you don't define them all, then aTypeErrorwill be be raised if any attempts are made to instantiate it.)

class file_like(ABCFileLike):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def write(self, line):
        print("Written:", line)

    def close(self):
        pass

    def flush(self):
        pass

print(isinstance(file_like(), ABCFileLike))  # True

You can even add existing classes to it by registering them with the new metaclass:

import io

print(isinstance(io.IOBase(), ABCFileLike))  # False
ABCFileLike.register(io.IOBase)
print(isinstance(io.IOBase(), ABCFileLike))  # True
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Please consider also up-voting (which is separate from accepting) any or all answers you found useful. –  martineau Dec 27 '13 at 21:00

isinstance(obj, some_class) just iterates up obj's inheritance chain, looking for some_class. Thus isinstance(file_like, io.IOBase), will be false, as your file_like class doesn't have io.IOBase in its ancestry. file_like doesn't designate an explicit parent, hence it implicitly inherits only from object. That's the only class - besides file_like itself - that will test positive for a file_like instance with isinstance().

What you are doing in file_like is defining the methods expected on a file-like object while not inheriting from any particular "file-like" class. This approach is called duck-typing, and it has many merits in dynamic languages, although it's more popular in others (e.g. Ruby) than Python. Still, if whatever you're providing your file_like instance to follows duck-typing, it should work, provided your file_like does in fact "quack like a file", i.e. behaves sufficiently like a file to not cause errors upon usage at the receiving end.

Of course, if the receiving end is not following duck-typing, for example tries to check types by isinstance() as you do here, this approach will fail.

Finally, a small stylistic nit: don't put empty parens on a class if it doesn't inherit anything explicitly. They are redundant.

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Thanks for your answer. It cleared up many of my questions. Thanks also for the style note, I believe it's a carryover from functions which requires parens. I'll take note of it –  minerz029 Dec 27 '13 at 8:21

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