Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have validation hooked up to a model that is bound to the TextBox container. When the window is first opened validation errors appear as the model is empty, I do not want to see validation errors until submit of the window or the text in the TextBox has changed or on lost focus.

Here is the TextBox:

<TextBox Text="{Binding 
                   Path=Firstname, 
                   UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, 
                   ValidatesOnDataErrors=True}"
         Width="124"
         Height="24"/>

How can this be achieved?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted
+150

This really depends on your implementation of IDataErrorInfo. If you base it around a Dictionary of error messages you can control when validation runs that adds to that list. You would normally want to do that from your property setters (like whenever you call PropertyChange), here calling CheckValidationState:

    public string this[string columnName]
    {
        get
        {
            return ValidateProperty(columnName);
        }
    }

    public Dictionary<string, string> Errors { get; private set; }

    protected void SetError(string propertyName, string errorMessage)
    {
        Debug.Assert(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName), "propertyName is null or empty.");
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName))
            return;

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(errorMessage))
        {
            if (Errors.ContainsKey(propertyName))
                Errors[propertyName] = errorMessage;
            else
                Errors.Add(propertyName, errorMessage);
        }
        else if (Errors.ContainsKey(propertyName))
            Errors.Remove(propertyName);

        NotifyPropertyChanged("Errors");
        NotifyPropertyChanged("Error");
        NotifyPropertyChanged("Item[]");
    }

    protected virtual string ValidateProperty(string propertyName)
    {
        return Errors.ContainsKey(propertyName) ? Errors[propertyName] : null;
    }

    protected virtual bool CheckValidationState<T>(string propertyName, T proposedValue)
    {
        // your validation logic here
    }

You can then also include a method that validates all of your properties (like during a save):

    protected bool Validate()
    {
        if (Errors.Count > 0)
            return false;

        bool result = true;
        foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            if (!CheckValidationState(propertyInfo.Name, propertyInfo.GetValue(this, null)))
                result = false;
            NotifyPropertyChanged(propertyInfo.Name);
        }
        return result;
    }

UPDATE:

I would recommend putting the above code into a base ViewModel class so you can reuse it. You could then create a derived class like this:

public class SampleViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private string _firstName;

    public SampleViewModel()
    {
        Save = new DelegateCommand<object>(SaveExecuted);
    }

    public DelegateCommand<object> Save { get; private set; }

    public string FirstName
    {
        get { return _firstName; }
        set
        {
            if (_firstName == value)
                return;

            CheckValidationState("FirstName", value);

            _firstName = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("FirstName");
        }
    }

    public void SaveExecuted(object obj)
    {
        bool isValid = Validate();
        MessageBox.Show(isValid ? "Saved" : "Validation Error. Save canceled"); // TODO: do something appropriate to your app here
    }

    protected override bool CheckValidationState<T>(string propertyName, T proposedValue)
    {
        // your validation logic here
        if (propertyName == "FirstName")
        {
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(proposedValue as String))
            {
                SetError(propertyName, "First Name is required.");
                return false;
            }
            else if (proposedValue.Equals("John"))
            {
                SetError(propertyName, "\"John\" is not an allowed name.");
                return false;
            }
            else
            {
                SetError(propertyName, String.Empty); // clear the error
                return true;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}

In this case I'm using a DelegateCommand to trigger the save operation but it could be anything that makes a method call to do the saving. This setup allows for the initial empty state to show up as valid in the UI but either a change or a call to Save updates the validation state. You can also get a lot more general and more complicated in the way you actually do the validation so it doesn't all end up in one method (here with some assumptions about the type) but this is simplified to make it easier to start with.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply John, could you expand on your answer a bit please. I tried to implement what you discussed and got a bit lost. Thanks... –  Burt Jan 26 '10 at 10:53
    
Burt - I updated to add more code to show how a class could implement this that I hope fills in some of the holes for you. Does that help you? –  John Bowen Jan 28 '10 at 0:43
    
Thanks John really appreciate it, went to up-vote you but somehow managed to remove a vote it didn't let me add it again. –  Burt Jan 28 '10 at 10:45
    
@JohnBowen Why NotifyPropertyChanged("Errors"); NotifyPropertyChanged("Error"); NotifyPropertyChanged("Item[]"); fired in SetError? –  johnny Jul 31 '12 at 7:35
add comment

If you are implementing IDataErrorInfo, I've achieved this by checking for null values in the implementation of the validation logic. When creating a new window, checking for null will prevent your validation logic from firing. For example:

public partial class Product : IDataErrorInfo
{
    #region IDataErrorInfo Members

    public string Error
    {
        get { return null; }
    }

    public string this[string columnName]
    {
        get
        {
            if (columnName == "ProductName")
            {
                // Only apply validation if there is actually a value
                if (this.ProductName != null)
                {
                    if (this.ProductName.Length <= 0 || this.ProductName.Length > 25)
                        return "Product Name must be between 1 and 25 characters";
                }
            }

            return null;
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

Also, if you want to fire the validation on TextBox.LostFocus, change your binding to LostFocus, like follows:

<TextBox Text="{Binding              
               Path=Firstname,              
               UpdateSourceTrigger=LostFocus,              
               ValidatesOnDataErrors=True}"             
     Width="124"             
     Height="24"/>
share|improve this answer
    
It might be valid for some of the fields to be null though what happens in that instance? –  Burt Jan 22 '10 at 0:21
1  
If null is a valid entry, then the validation will not return an error if you tell it not to. It all depends on how you implement your business logic. For example, if the field can either be null or empty, just allow those exceptions to be made in your logic. Can you give us an example of what all you are wanting to check for on a particular field? –  Brent Jan 23 '10 at 17:11
add comment

in your app.xaml file, you need to use custom textbox style for textbox validation without any third party component.

enter image description here

<Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
                        <Grid Name="test">
                            <Border Background="{StaticResource TextBackColor}" BorderBrush="#FF888888" x:Name="Bd" CornerRadius="1" BorderThickness="1">
                                <ScrollViewer Margin="0" x:Name="PART_ContentHost"/>
                            </Border>
                            <Image Name="ErrorImage" Width="15" Height="15" Margin="0,0,4,0" Source="Images/validate.png" HorizontalAlignment="Right">

                            </Image>
                        </Grid>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
share|improve this answer
add comment

What I do, I donno if this is the correct way (I would be glad to learn, now is a chance), but in the initializer of the entity or the model I run all the validators.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.