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I was having a look at the Tk demo widget 8.5/8.6 and found the line inside:

eval destroy [winfo child .]

When I looked up winfo, there was no child option, but there was a children option. I tested a few things with the two and they appear to be the same.

% package require Tk
% pack [label .m1 -text "Hello"]
% pack [label .m2 -text "World"]
% puts [winfo child .]
.m1 .m2
% puts [winfo children .]
.m1 .m2

Those two seem to be the same to me, but one is documented and the other isn't. Is there any difference or is that only a consequence of different versions of Tcl (it seems that child was used earlier and is now being replaced with children -perhaps because of a bug?-, although both behave roughly similarly)?

If they are different, is there any reason why someone would use one instead of the other?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Tcl allows you to abbreviate any command to the closest non-ambiguous substring. For instance:

% string range abcd 0 2
abc
% stri ran abcd 0 2
abc
% str r abcd 0 2
unknown or ambiguous subcommand "r": must be bytelength, compare, equal, first, index, is,  last, length, map, match, range, repeat, replace, reverse, tolower, totitle, toupper, trim, trimleft, trimright, wordend, or wordstart
% 

The final line has an ambiguous match - r can match any of range, repeat, replace or reverse so we get an error raised. ra is the shortest match possible for range here.

The specific documentation applicable to this is actually in the man page for Tcl_GetIndexFromObj where is states

A match occurs if objPtr's string value is identical to one of the strings in tablePtr, or if it is a non-empty unique abbreviation for exactly one of the strings in tablePtr and the TCL_EXACT flag was not specified

This is because the Tcl_GetIndexFromObj API call is typically how commands and subcommands are identified throughout the Tcl sources.

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Wow, that's really surprising... I never knew that Tcl was holding such a capability. Thank you for answering :) –  Jerry Dec 27 '13 at 12:39
    
Btw, this might be a bit off-topic, but would you happen to know whether this is something quite unique to Tcl or are there some other languages with APIs behaving in a similar way? –  Jerry Dec 27 '13 at 12:41
4  
The abbreviation of commands is only when interactive; the abbreviation of subcommands is always enabled. Good Tcl scripts do not use abbreviations. There are no long-term guarantees that particular abbreviations will continue to be unique in future versions of Tcl. –  Donal Fellows Dec 27 '13 at 14:24
    
@DonalFellows Thank you for the clarification and it's understandable that proper scripts shouldn't rely on that API for some sort of 'autocomplete' feature. One last thing that bothers me a bit, is that I wouldn't have expected something like that in the demo widget, it's like putting some 'bad practice' in demos. –  Jerry Dec 29 '13 at 9:40
    
@Jerry The prefix handling is baked into the base API, Tcl_GetIndexFromObj (except for top-level commands, where it is part of unknown). That makes not having expansion actually take more code… –  Donal Fellows Dec 29 '13 at 14:37

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