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I have a byte array in memory, read from a file. I would like to split the byte array at a certain point(index) without having to just create a new byte array and copy each byte at a time, increasing the in memory foot print of the operation. What I would like is something like this:

byte[] largeBytes = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];  
byte[] smallPortion;  
smallPortion = split(largeBytes, 3);  

smallPortion would equal 1,2,3,4
largeBytes would equal 5,6,7,8,9

Thank you, Keith

EDIT: @Michael, Nice code..

I see how this example works, by just creating specific "views" of the original array.

Just a few FYI questions for others who may read this later.

How would you see this working when passing the resultant view to other classes for use? How does the reference to the original array stay in scope?

I guess since you would actually be passing references to the "views", the other classes will continue to access the view in the same manner as the example in your Main. The View contains a private reference to the original array keeping in in scope and would not be GC'ed.

I think this is the answer.

Thank you, Keith

BTW, I love this site!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is how I would do that:

class ArrayView<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    private readonly T[] array;
    private readonly int offset, count;

    public ArrayView(T[] array, int offset, int count)
    {
        this.array = array;
        this.offset = offset;
        this.count = count;
    }

    public int Length
    {
        get { return count; }
    }

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            if (index < 0 || index >= this.count)
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            else
                return this.array[offset + index];
        }
        set
        {
            if (index < 0 || index >= this.count)
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            else
                this.array[offset + index] = value;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        for (int i = offset; i < offset + count; i++)
            yield return array[i];
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        IEnumerator<T> enumerator = this.GetEnumerator();
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return enumerator.Current;
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        byte[] arr = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };
        ArrayView<byte> p1 = new ArrayView<byte>(arr, 0, 5);
        ArrayView<byte> p2 = new ArrayView<byte>(arr, 5, 5);
        Console.WriteLine("First array:");
        foreach (byte b in p1)
        {
            Console.Write(b);
        }
        Console.Write("\n");
        Console.WriteLine("Second array:");
        foreach (byte b in p2)
        {
            Console.Write(b);
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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FYI. System.ArraySegment<T> structure basically is the same thing as ArrayView<T> in the code above. You can use this out-of-the-box structure in the same way, if you'd like.

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Interesting. Too bad I didn't see this one when I was working on that project. Thanks for the info anyway. –  Keith Sirmons Nov 2 '09 at 17:23

In C# with Linq you can do this:

smallPortion = largeBytes.Take(4).ToArray();
largeBytes = largeBytes.Skip(4).Take(5).ToArray();

;)

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2  
The OP is wondering how to do this without having to [...] create a new byte array and copy each byte at a time But that is exactly what your LINQ code does. Twice. –  Christian Klauser Dec 21 '11 at 22:00
    
..this helped me solve a problem I had that didn't get solved by ArraySegment<T>.. –  AceMark Mar 18 '12 at 15:19
    
@Christian, to avoid using adittional memory just remove both ".ToArray()" calls. That will return two IEnumerables with a lot less lines of code. –  Gerardo Grignoli Jul 12 '12 at 19:27
    
@GerardoGrignoli true, but that gives you an IEnumerable<byte>. While it is perfectly safe (and fast) to iterate over that enumerable multiple times there are two downsides: a) you still can't index into that section of the array directly. Sure, the LINQ implementations of Skip/Take take advantage of the array structure, but they do so by trying to cast the IEnumerable to Collection or Array. b) Once you return an IEnumerable from your API, clients are no longer guaranteed (by the type system) that the enumerable is safe and efficient to iterate over multiple times. –  Christian Klauser Jul 12 '12 at 20:24

Try this one:

private IEnumerable<byte[]> ArraySplit(byte[] bArray, int intBufforLengt)
    {
        int bArrayLenght = bArray.Length;
        byte[] bReturn = null;

        int i = 0;
        for (; bArrayLenght > (i + 1) * intBufforLengt; i++)
        {
            bReturn = new byte[intBufforLengt];
            Array.Copy(bArray, i * intBufforLengt, bReturn, 0, intBufforLengt);
            yield return bReturn;
        }

        int intBufforLeft = bArrayLenght - i * intBufforLengt;
        if (intBufforLeft > 0)
        {
            bReturn = new byte[intBufforLeft];
            Array.Copy(bArray, i * intBufforLengt, bReturn, 0, intBufforLeft);
            yield return bReturn;
        }
    }
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I'm not sure what you mean by:

I would like to split the byte array at a certain point(index) without having to just create a new byte array and copy each byte at a time, increasing the in memory foot print of the operation.

In most languages, certainly C#, once an array has been allocated, there is no way to change the size of it. It sounds like you're looking for a way to change the length of an array, which you can't. You also want to somehow recycle the memory for the second part of the array, to create a second array, which you also can't do.

In summary: just create a new array.

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You can't. What you might want is keep a starting point and number of items; in essence, build iterators. If this is C++, you can just use std::vector<int> and use the built-in ones.

In C#, I'd build a small iterator class that holds start index, count and implements IEnumerable<>.

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