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I've reached a point where I would like to write an automated test to verify the content of a WPF View that's bound up to a View Model in a particular state.

In concept, its fairly simple. Create a View Model, set its state, create the appropriate View, add the View to a Window, set the Data Context of the View, show the Window, take a screenshot, compare against a previously taken screenshot. This sort of test is useful to detect unintended changes, as well as verifying that all the View can actually be created without error.

However, creating an instance of my View is proving problematic. It requires a set of resources that are not included in the XAML definition itself. These resources are included in the Application level resource dictionary in the actual application, so by the time the View is created in the real application, those resources are already available to it.

When I create an instance of this View inside my test, it throws a XamlParseException about being unable to find various resources (understandably).

I do not want to simply add appropriate resource dictionaries to the XAML definition of the View itself because this would increase the amount of effort (computer effort) required to create one of these View objects, as well as increasing the amount of memory required for each instance. My understanding is that this is a result of ResourceDictionary's not being shared in that way.

I have tried:

  • Creating an instance of App.xaml inside the test (which sets the Application.Current property).
  • Setting the Application.Current.Resources property to the the Resources property of an instance of App.xaml.
  • Setting the Resources property of the Page directly.
  • Setting the Resources property of the Window directly (the Window the Page is being added to for the test).

Essentially, I need to know if there is a way to engineer a situation where I can configure a set of Application resources for standalone instances of WPF components to use inside an automated test.

You can reproduce the problem by creating the following structure, with everything but the View_Test.cs file in one project, and the View_Test.cs file living in a test project. Run the app and it works. Run the test and it fails.

App.xaml

<Application 
    x:Class="Blah.App"        
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml">
    <Application.Resources>
        <ResourceDictionary>
            <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
                <ResourceDictionary Source="Styles.xaml" />
            </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
        </ResourceDictionary>
    </Application.Resources>
</Application>

Styles.xaml

<ResourceDictionary 
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <SolidColorBrush x:Key="SpecialBrush" Color="Black" />
</ResourceDictionary>

MainWindow.xaml

<Window 
    x:Class="Blah.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:Blah="clr-namespace:Blah"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <Blah:View/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

View.xaml

<UserControl 
    x:Class="AutomatedTestUserControlApplicationResources.View"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
    mc:Ignorable="d" 
    d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300">
    <Grid Background="{StaticResource SpecialBrush}">

    </Grid>
</UserControl>

View_Test.cs

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using Blah;
using System.Windows;

namespace Blah.Test
{
    [TestClass]
    public class View_Test
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void Test()
        {
            var view = new View();

            var window = new Window();
            window.Content = view;

            window.ShowDialog();
        }
    }
}

Update:

I had some luck with creating an extra constructor for the View in question that takes a ResourceDictionary, as a way to inject the View with some context for its initialization. This constructor overload is only used for tests, in the real application the resource context is already available from the Application resources.

public View(ResourceDictionary resourceContext = null)
{
    if (resourceContext != null) Resources.MergedDictionaries.Add(resourceContext);
    InitializeComponent();
}

This solves the specific example that I posted above in a way that is not dependent on initializing unrelated objects just to get the View to work (which flies in the face of good dependency injection practices).

However, it brought to light some additional problems when I tried to implement it in my actual project. My resource context at the Application level is actually the merge of 4 different resource dictionaries, the latter of which are dependent on the earlier (in that they reference resources specified in an earlier entry).

AppResources.xaml

<ResourceDictionary 
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
        <ResourceDictionary Source="Style/GlobalColour.xaml"/>
        <ResourceDictionary Source="Style/GlobalBrush.xaml"/> <!-- Dependent on GlobalColour-->
        <ResourceDictionary Source="Style/GlobalStyle.xaml"/>
        <ResourceDictionary Source="Resources/GlobalContent.xaml"/>
    </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
</ResourceDictionary>

Creating a ResourceDictionary from this file in my test project, and then injecting that ResourceDictionary into my View during construction throws a XamlParseException relating to a StaticResource not being found (the resource that cant be found lives in GlobalBrush, and is dependent on an entry in GlobalColour).

I'll update as I explore further.

Update:

I had absolutely no luck manually creating and using the AppResources ResourceDictionary above. I could not get the interdependencies between dictionaries in the MergedDictionaries to work. I couldn't even manually flatten the ResourceDictionary instance, because when I tried to access a resource in a dictionary that was dependent on a resource in a parallel dictionary it threw a XamlParseException.

As a result, the idea of injecting a ResourceDictionary into the View via a constructor was not feasible for use in my solution (although it works if the app resources are a flat ResourceDictioanry).

At the end of this journey, I have come to the conclusion that the only way to instantiate a View where the xaml does not directly contain references to the resources (without having to instantiate the entire App) is include references to the appropriate ResourceDictionary wherever a resource is used, directly in the xaml. You then have to manage the performance issues at run time (because you're instantiating hundreds of duplicate ResourceDictionaries) by using a SharedResourceDictionary (there are a number of implementations of this concept available on the internet).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

This isn't actually all that hard you just need to use Application.LoadComponent to create instances of everything so that the right resources are available at the right time.

The key is to load everything via its XAML rather than creating instances of the classes as the class only contains half the information.

[TestClass]
public class View_Test
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Test()
    {
        //set initial ResourceAssembly so we can load the App
        Application.ResourceAssembly = Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof (App));

        //load app
        var app = (App) Application.LoadComponent(new Uri("App.xaml", UriKind.Relative));

        //load window and assign to app
        var mainWindow = (Window) Application.LoadComponent(new Uri("MainWindow.xaml", UriKind.Relative));
        app.MainWindow = mainWindow;

        //load view and assign to window content
        var view = (UserControl) Application.LoadComponent(new Uri("View.xaml", UriKind.Relative));
        mainWindow.Content = view;

        //show the window
        mainWindow.Show();
    }
}

Edit: Simpler Version

I just had a look at some disassembled code to see how its done internally and this can be simplified to not require the XAML references. The most important bits to get things going are setting Application.ResourceAssembly and creating the App and calling InitializeComponent on it. The window isn't necessary specifically you could just create a new window to hold the view.

[TestClass]
public class View_Test
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Test()
    {
        Application.ResourceAssembly = Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof (App));

        var app = new App();
        app.InitializeComponent();

        var mainWindow = new MainWindow();
        app.MainWindow = mainWindow;

        var view = new View();
        mainWindow.Content = view;
        mainWindow.Show();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked. Feels kind of gross to have to load the entire application (referencing the files by using string names too) just to open up a single View. Perhaps its simply the price I pay for not being willing/able to make the view entirely self contained in terms of resources and resource references. Thank you for your answer. –  Todd Bowles Dec 30 '13 at 7:38

What you're after here is a UI test. Microsoft's Coded UI framework would be your best bet. Taking a screenshot of your application is not going to be a reliable way of determining that it's working properly.

With a Coded UI test, you can record actions against your UI and add assertions to verify that the UI is behaving properly. When you execute the test, it actually launches the application and plays back the actions you recorded to get the application to the expected state. It's generally pretty painless to get started with.

Naturally, UI tests are best used sparingly since they're a lot slower. A reasonable unit test should take a few milliseconds to run, but pretty much any UI test is going to take several orders of magnitude longer.

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I am actually quite familiar with Coded UI. I used it for our UI tests in a previous project, and eventually regretted it quite a lot. I find that while it can be useful at times, its fragile, slow and hard to maintain as the application evolves. As a result of my experience with Coded UI, I'm much more interested in verifying single Views and how they react to the state of their View Models through something simple, like a screenshot. Simple screenshot comparisons are not perfect, I know, but they provide a great smoke test. –  Todd Bowles Dec 30 '13 at 4:25
    
Another reason not to use Coded UI, is that I don't want to boot up my entire application, and go through a series of actions to get to the page I want to perform a smoke test on. I can see how that sort of big picture navigation can be useful for detecting problems, and I've used that strategy in the past, but in the end it just ended up breaking all the time and the tests ended up costing more than the benefit they provided. –  Todd Bowles Dec 30 '13 at 4:48
    
How is taking a screenshot going to be any less brittle? If you change any aspect of your UI, your test is going to break. Coded UI is a lot more resilient to UI changes than a screenshot. –  Daniel Mann Dec 30 '13 at 4:54
    
The fragility I found in Coded UI came from its ability to actually execute the commands you had previously recorded (mostly around finding the component in question). The fragility inherent in a screenshot test can be managed by making the process of accepting screenshot changes mostly painless. In the time I was working with Coded UI, I did not find a way to make rebuilding the Coded UI maps (to deal with changes) painless. –  Todd Bowles Dec 30 '13 at 4:58
    
I believe the usefulness of a single View based screenshot test comes from the fact that it isolates it from the rest of the application, and allows you to focus on testing only exactly what you need to. This is of course how I ran into my original problem, where some configuration of the root application is actually required in order for the View to work. –  Todd Bowles Dec 30 '13 at 5:02

The system doesn't care where it finds the needed resources. They need to be found somewhere up the visual tree. That's why its ok to add the styles to the window instead the Application.

Having this in mind I'd simply load the style.xaml using the XAMLReader which results in a ResourceDictionary object. Then assign/add this resource to your Window object.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, but it appears as though the resources need to be available at the time the View is constructed (likely when its calling InitializeComponent internally), before its even a member of the Visual Tree. Since I'm creating the View myself, there doesn't appear to be a way for me to say "and here is your resource context", which would usually be done somehow by WPF. –  Todd Bowles Dec 31 '13 at 23:42

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