Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I've a code like:

import java.util.Date;
import my.own.Date;

class Test{

  public static void main(String [] args){

    // I want to choose my.own.Date here. How?
    ..
    // I want to choose util.Date here. How ?

  }
}

Should I be full qualified class names? Can I get rid of the import statements? Is such a scenario common in real world programming?

Thanks,
Roger

share|improve this question
    
Not really an answer to your question but in C# you may use an alias for any namespace. May be it is just syntactic sugar but it is really helpfull: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7f38zh8x.aspx –  borjab Apr 11 at 9:38
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You can omit the import statements and refer to them using the entire path. Eg:

java.util.Date javaDate = new java.util.Date()
my.own.Date myDate = new my.own.Date();

But I would say that using two classes with the same name and a similiar function is usually not the best idea unless you can make it really clear which is which.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the last statement. –  BalusC Jan 17 '10 at 3:23
    
If you're using Eclipse, you can change the name of your.own.Date using ctrl+shift+R. This will automatically change it everywhere you refer to it in your code, as well as in the file (and filename) your/own/Date.java. Any other IDE probably has a similar feature. –  MatrixFrog Jan 17 '10 at 4:14
2  
I don't agree with last statement. If you want to design your own Date class, the Date is the perfect name. You will use it in most of your code. However, sometimes you will need to call the java.util.Date notably to make conversions between both. –  paradigmatic Jan 17 '10 at 4:37
    
@MatrixFrog The feature in Eclipse that you have specified is also provided by Netbeans IDE. This feature is known as "Refactor". Your info wasn't wrong but it is not the answer of the question asked. If he (Roger) is developing that code, then definately he knows that he can change or refactor the name of his Class. What he is asking is different from the answer you gave. –  Yatendra Goel Jan 17 '10 at 7:58
4  
@Yatendra That's why I added it as a comment rather than an answer. I was expanding on the point Ellie P. made at the end of her answer. Roger probably knows that, but the point of SO is to help other developers, not just the person who asked the question. If people don't know about the IDE feature, they might think that it's unfeasible to switch names by hand, so I thought it would be useful to throw in that info. –  MatrixFrog Jan 17 '10 at 8:19
add comment

use the fully qualified name instead of importing the class.

e.g.

//import java.util.Date; //delete this
//import my.own.Date;

class Test{

   public static void main(String [] args){

      // I want to choose my.own.Date here. How?
      my.own.Date myDate = new my.own.Date();

      // I want to choose util.Date here. How ?
      java.util.Date javaDate = new java.util.Date();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Another way to do it is subclass it:

package my.own;

public class FQNDate extends Date {

}

And then import my.own.FQNDate in packages that have java.util.Date.

share|improve this answer
    
I do like this except (it is simple) however it doesn't address the issue for say accessing static methods. –  Justin Ohms Oct 14 '13 at 22:57
add comment

Yes, when you import classes with the same simple names, you must refer to them by their fully qualified class names. I would leave the import statements in, as it gives other developers a sense of what is in the file when they are working with it.

java.util.Data date1 = new java.util.Date();
my.own.Date date2 = new my.own.Date();
share|improve this answer
add comment

This scenario is not so common in real-world programming, but not so strange too. It happens sometimes that two classes in different packages have same name and we need both of them.

It is not mandatory that if two classes have same name, then both will contain same functionalities and we should pick only one of them.

If we need both, then there is no harm in using that. And it's not a bad programming idea too.

But we should use fully qualified names of the classes (that have same name) in order to make it clear which class we are referring too.

:)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I hit this issue when, for example, mapping one class to another (such as when switching to a new set of classes to represent person data). At that point, you need both classes because that is the whole point of the code--to map one to the other. And you can't rename the classes in either place (again, the job is to map, not to go change what someone else did).

Fully qualified is one way. It appears you can't actually include both import statements, because Java gets worried about which "Person" is meant, for example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you have your own date class you should distinguish it form the built in Date class. i.e. why did you create your own. Something like ImmutableDate or BetterDate or NanoDate, even MyDate would indicate why you have your own date class. In this case, they will have a unique name.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.