Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a variable v that is a Vector, and I'm trying to add an element to it using +=. It complains that it expects a String instead of an Int:

Welcome to Scala version 2.10.3 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.7.0_45).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> var v = Vector[Int]()
v: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int] = Vector()

scala> v += 3
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Int(3)
 required: String
              v += 3
                   ^

Why does it expect a String? When I give it a String (which is ofcourse wrong), it says it expects a Vector[Int]:

scala> v += "three"
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : String
 required: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]
              v += "three"
                ^

And when I give it a Vector[Int], it again expects a String:

scala> v += Vector(3)
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]
 required: String
              v += Vector(3)
                         ^

Why does this happen?

I know I can add an element using +:=. But why can I not use +=, like for a Set?

share|improve this question
1  
Vector have no "+" method (lookup scaladoc), so compiler defaults to StringAdd -- it will try to concatenate two strings via + method: vector.toString and your right side argument, which is not automatically converted to String, hence it complains. –  om-nom-nom Dec 27 '13 at 11:47
1  
@om-nom-nom: You could make it an answer for Jesper to accept it. –  senia Dec 27 '13 at 12:01
    
But why does Vector not have a + method (it has +: instead), and why does Set have a + method but not +: - why is this not the same for Vector and Set? –  Jesper Dec 27 '13 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's go through this cases one by one:

scala> v += 3
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Int(3)
 required: String
              v += 3
                   ^

Here is the main problem that Vector have no + method, so compiler will default to string concatination (which is highly criticized recently as a design flaw, by the way). The problem is that left side (vector) is convertible automatically to string (via Vector.toString), but right one is not.

scala> v += "three"
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : String
 required: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]
              v += "three"
                ^

Here concatenation is ok, but you're trying to put result of type String to variable of type Vector[Int], which is why compiler complains. But if you define v as Any compiler will stop complaining:

var v: Any = Vector[Int]()
v += "foo"
// res1: Any = Vector()foo

Now, next case

scala> v += Vector(3)
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]
 required: String
              v += Vector(3)
                         ^

String concatenation again, and again, result of type String goes to the variable of type Vector.

Now, talking about why Vector does not have the very same + operation: ordinary Set have no notion of order, whereas Vector, and Seq in general have and + would be confusing: do I add to the end or to the start? So instead of implicit rule, you have to explicitly decide whether you use :+ or +:.

share|improve this answer
4  
It is worth noting though that there a few exceptions, e.g. mutable.Buffer does use += to append instead of :+=... In any case, everyone should just vote for SI-194 IMO –  0__ Dec 27 '13 at 12:48
    
@0__ Looks like voting is not possible anymore, since the issue has been closed. –  Jesper Dec 27 '13 at 15:19
    
First case: "The problem is that anything can be augmented with a + method that takes a String, but 3 is not a String." –  som-snytt Dec 29 '13 at 6:08
    
SI-194 is now open again –  Seth Tisue Feb 13 '14 at 16:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.