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Let's say that i have object my_obj

and i get this object from database, with some more calculation, it doesn't matter...

and then i need to iterate via such object, like:

my_obj.each do |m|
 some_method(m.id)
end

this code is not good, becouse if my_obj is nil, i will get error like:

undefined method `each' for nil:NilClass

so i decide to write:

  if my_obj.present?
    my_obj.each do |m|
     some_method(m.id)
    end
  end

but i think that there is one more way of doing this, without writting everywhere if construction.

so how could i iterate via object, only if it is not null?

share|improve this question
    
'object' implies singular, 'objects' is plural. You can't iterate a singular object. –  Billy Chan Dec 27 '13 at 13:52
    
@BillyChan i know, how in such case i could do... –  brabertaser1992 Dec 27 '13 at 13:53
1  
and how come you have nil instead of [] if it's a collection? you're shadowing a problem somewhere else, I am afraid. –  tokland Dec 27 '13 at 14:38
    
@tokland listen, my_obj = Article.all, let's say so... –  brabertaser1992 Dec 27 '13 at 14:47
1  
@brabertaser1992 Article.all never returns nil. If there are no records, an empty collection is returned, i.e. [] –  Stefan Dec 27 '13 at 15:24

6 Answers 6

I found the code a bit anti-pattern for normal OOP principle "Tell, Don't ask". I tried the question in console and found your worry unnecessary.

No matter what the result is, blank Array or blank ActiveRecord::Relation object, each all works and return a blank array [].

Article.count
# => 0

articles = Article.all # Return array in Rails 3
articles.each { |a| puts a.title }
# => []

articles = Article.scoped # Return ActiveRecord::Relation object in Rails 3
articles.each { |a| puts a.title }
# => []

I would suggest you to review the method and returned result of your query. If your query returns unusual things, make sure it returns at least a blank Array. Then you don't need to consider too much.

share|improve this answer

They easiest way to handle this is to surround your object with the 'Array' conversion function which will coerce your possibly nil input into an array while leaving an existing array untouched, e.g.

>> Array(nil)
=> []

and

>> Array([1])
=> [1]

So in your case:

Array(my_obj).each do |m|
 some_method(m.id)
end
share|improve this answer
    
Not that Kernel::Array also turns scalars into arrays: Array(1) => [1]. –  dbenhur Dec 27 '13 at 19:10
    
Right, it's very handy for methods that could accept an array or a scalar. i.e. def my_method(scalar_or_array) arr = Array(scalar_or_array) –  rainkinz Dec 27 '13 at 19:14

The collection query should always return iterable object, but there are several ways. The problem of nil checks led to a pattern named NullObjects which is often the best solution. Apart from that you can do:

my_object.to_a.each do |m|
  some_method(m.id)
end

or

my_object.try(:each) do |m|
  some_method(m.id)
end

or

(my_object || []).each do |m|
  some_method(m.id)
end
share|improve this answer

In Rails, you can do Object#try method:

my_object.try(:each) do |m|
  some_method(m.id)
end

It will call each (returning its result) with attached block if my_object is other than nil. Otherwise, it won't call each method and will return nil.

share|improve this answer
    
@brabertaser1992 It's unlikely there's something shorter and more elegant to achieve your goal. –  Marek Lipka Dec 27 '13 at 13:58
    
I think your solution is the most logical, since the "try" method has been designed for this exact kind of case. Besides, it also has the advantage to return nil if my_object is nil. However, in pratice, I prefer the solution of Phlip, with which you know that your object is always an enumerable and you can apply all the enumerable methods on it. –  Jean-Daube Dec 27 '13 at 16:03

Everyone forgot the awesome [my_objects].flatten.compact!

share|improve this answer

when you initialize the my_obj do it like this

my_obj = Model.all || [] # Empty array will not iterate or throw error

Ex:

[].each do |x|
  p "I will not execute"
end
share|improve this answer

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