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I have a Managed Object Context with a few NSFetchedResultsControllers listening to different entities throughout my app, working perfectly for the most part.

I'm at a loss on how to solve the following scenario though: I am setting a relation on an entity when the user clicks a button in the entity's corresponding table view cell. This currently causes the entity to change and the FRC to tell the tableview to redraw the entire cell, rendering the button in it's default Control State.

Is there a way to change an entity without it being noticed by one of my FRCs?

I would like to be able to have this effect on only specific updates (controlled by myself, such as setting or removing a relation), compared to disabling the whole FRC for a while, as to not loose the functionality for other updates that might be happening at the same time.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I'm thinking on using a bool value to reach your goal. That value would allow you to control how the NSFetchedResultsController delegate will respond to updates.. – Lorenzo B. Dec 27 '13 at 14:47
    
The problem is that the cells are redrawn "instantly" canceling normal transition animations of UI, is that correct ? – A-Live Dec 27 '13 at 14:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe I did not understand your question but if you want to just disable the NSFetchedResultsController delegate and hence the rendering, as I commented, you can just use a bool value for this.

Here the basic idea. Here, stopAutomaticTrackingOfChanges would be public while beganUpdates can be maintained within a class extension.

- (void)controllerWillChangeContent:(NSFetchedResultsController *)controller
{
    if (!self.stopAutomaticTrackingOfChanges) {
        [self.tableView beginUpdates];
        self.beganUpdates = YES;
    }
}

- (void)controller:(NSFetchedResultsController *)controller
  didChangeSection:(id <NSFetchedResultsSectionInfo>)sectionInfo
           atIndex:(NSUInteger)sectionIndex
     forChangeType:(NSFetchedResultsChangeType)type
{
    if (!self.stopAutomaticTrackingOfChanges)
    {
        switch(type)
        {
            // your code here
        }
    }
}    

- (void)controller:(NSFetchedResultsController *)controller
   didChangeObject:(id)anObject
       atIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
     forChangeType:(NSFetchedResultsChangeType)type
      newIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)newIndexPath
{
    if (!self.stopAutomaticTrackingOfChanges)
    {
        switch(type)
        {
            // your code here
        }
    }
}

- (void)controllerDidChangeContent:(NSFetchedResultsController *)controller
{
    if (self.beganUpdates) [self.tableView endUpdates];
}

The idea of this has been taken from CoreDataTableViewController.h/.m code by Stanford course (reference http://www.stanford.edu/class/cs193p/cgi-bin/drupal/downloads-2011-fall).

share|improve this answer
    
@MartinR I did not understand it from the question. I will wait for OP details. It's not clear if the OP would this or not. Thanks for the comment. Anyway, I will remove my answer if not correct for the question. Thanks. – Lorenzo B. Dec 27 '13 at 15:46
    
@MartinR The order of the result set will not change in this scenario. In fact nothing will change in the view at all. This could work, but then I'd be missing any other changes to the data set happening at the same time. This will probably never happen, but it could. I'd rather have it disabled for a specific change rather than for a specific period of time. – akelagercrantz Dec 27 '13 at 16:25
    
@flexaddicted: It seems that the assumption in my comment was wrong, therefore I have deleted it. – Martin R Dec 27 '13 at 20:07

You could use the "primitive accessor" method

[object setPrimitiveValue:... forKey:...]

because that does not cause any change notifications. But this may have unwanted side-effects.

A better solution might be to store the button state in a (transient) attribute of the object, so that you can correctly restore it when the cell is redrawn.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, but since I'm saving the context immediately after the update I get change notifications anyway. Is there any way around this? – akelagercrantz Dec 27 '13 at 16:47
    
@akelagercrantz: I don't know. What about the alternative suggestion? – Martin R Dec 27 '13 at 16:49
    
It could work but is quite cumbersome in my scenario since the button state is temporary and will change after a set period of time (showing feedback after a click - user added product to cart). – akelagercrantz Dec 27 '13 at 17:00
    
@akelagercrantz: But it can happen at any time that the cell is redrawn, due to scrolling. – Martin R Dec 27 '13 at 17:33
    
Indeed, but that I can live with. If the user scrolls away and back again the feedback from the button has probably already been noticed and is no longer relevant. – akelagercrantz Dec 27 '13 at 18:31

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