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I have two arrays a and b of dimensions 3x1 and 3x3 and I want to sum them up like here:

>>> a = np.arange(3).reshape(3,1)
>>> a
array([[0],
       [1],
       [2]])
>>> b = np.arange(9).reshape(3,3)
>>> b
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [3, 4, 5],
       [6, 7, 8]])
>>> c = a + b

The problem is I was expecting c to be:

array([[0, 1, 2],
       [4, 4, 5],
       [8, 7, 8]])

I mean the first column of a added to the first column of b, but I got instead:

>>> c
array([[ 0,  1,  2],
       [ 4,  5,  6],
       [ 8,  9, 10]])

Why? How can I do what I want?

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Can we sum matrices of different dimensions? –  Digital_Reality Dec 27 '13 at 15:08
    
@Digital_Reality Thanks to your post I have an idea! –  xndrme Dec 27 '13 at 15:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you add matrices of shape (3,3) and (3,1), the latter gets broadcasted (to a-(3,3) equivalent) which can be thought of as:

[0 0 0]
[1 1 1] 
[2 2 2]

But in your case you only want to add to the first column, so you should avoid the broadcast operation, and add to the first column directly, like:

c = b.copy()
c[:,0] += a[:,0]
c
=> 
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [4, 4, 5],
       [8, 7, 8]])
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These are the normal broadcasting rules of Numpy. In this case the column is the same number of rows as the 2D array, so it is added to all columns of the 2D array.

If you want to add to just the first column do:

c = b.copy()
c[:, :1] += a
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Using numpy.hstack, slice:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.arange(3).reshape(3,1)
>>> b = np.arange(9).reshape(3,3)
>>> np.hstack([a + b[:,:1], b[:, 1:]]) # a + b[:,:1] to add the first column.
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [4, 4, 5],
       [8, 7, 8]])

or

>>> c = b.copy()
>>> c[:,:1] += a
>>> c
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [4, 4, 5],
       [8, 7, 8]])
share|improve this answer

Another option is to use

In [59]: c=np.zeros((3,3),dtype=int); c[:,0]=np.arange(3)

In [60]: c
Out[60]: 
array([[0, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [2, 0, 0]])

or the equivalent instead of a.

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