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I was thinking about a potential problem in a recent project that could be caused by a non-unique index in pandas so I started playing around with some scenarios to see what would happen. In doing so, I stumbled on the following strange behavior:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: pd.version.version
Out[2]: '0.12.0'

In [3]: df1 = pd.DataFrame(range(10), index=[1, 2]*5)

In [4]: df2 = pd.DataFrame(range(10), index=range(5)*2)

In [5]: df1
Out[5]: 
   0
1  0
2  1
1  2
2  3
1  4
2  5
1  6
2  7
1  8
2  9

In [6]: df2
Out[6]: 
   0
0  0
1  1
2  2
3  3
4  4
0  5
1  6
2  7
3  8
4  9

If I pass df2's index to df1's indexer, I get some unexpected results (indicated by arrows)

In [7]: df1.ix[df2.index]
Out[7]: 
              0
0           NaN
1  2.000000e+00
1  4.000000e+00
1  6.000000e+00
1  8.000000e+00
1  1.000000e+00 <---
2  3.000000e+00
2  5.000000e+00
2  7.000000e+00
2  9.000000e+00
2  0.000000e+00 <---
3           NaN
4           NaN
0           NaN
1  8.000000e+00
1  1.000000e+00 <---
1  3.000000e+00 <---
1  5.000000e+00 <---
1  7.000000e+00 <---
2  9.000000e+00 
2  3.636673e+17 <---
2  4.020594e+17 <---
2  3.628229e+17 <---
2  2.171412e+18 <---
3           NaN
4           NaN

Not only are there values that were not in either DataFrame, but some of the values associated with each index are wrong/unexpected; the values associated with 1 should be 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8, and the values associated with 2 should be 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. I thought this might have something to do with DataFrame.ix accepting either positional indices or labels, but the same thing happens with DataFrame.loc

In [10]: df1.loc[df2.index]
Out[10]: 
              0
0           NaN
1  2.000000e+00
1  4.000000e+00
1  6.000000e+00
1  8.000000e+00
1  1.000000e+00
2  3.000000e+00
2  5.000000e+00
2  7.000000e+00
2  9.000000e+00
2  0.000000e+00
3           NaN
4           NaN
0           NaN
1  8.000000e+00
1  1.000000e+00
1  3.000000e+00
1  5.000000e+00
1  7.000000e+00
2  9.000000e+00
2  3.625411e+17
2  3.996824e+17
2  4.009981e+17
2  3.636670e+17
3           NaN
4           NaN

I have rerun this scenario multiple times and the unexpected values always occur in the same place, but may be different values. Why is this happening, and why isn't it instead raising an exception? I can't find an explanation in the documentation, and this happens both on my 32-bit Windows system at work and my 64-bit Linux system at home. I'm using numpy 1.8.0, btw.

share|improve this question
    
I can't reproduce this with master (0.13.0rc1-125-g4952858). –  DSM Dec 27 '13 at 17:33
    
@DSM reproduced with 0.12 with df = pd.DataFrame(range(2), index=[1, 1]); df.ix[[0,1]], and correct output for df.ix[[1,0]] –  alko Dec 27 '13 at 17:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

duplicate indexing of a duplicate index was somewhat broken in 0.12. Here's the result for 0.13. Your results are the result of some internal routines accessing non-initialized memory (so the 'values' that are returned may not be consistent from run to run - hence its a bug).

You have to really think about what you are asking pandas to do.

You are saying looks up based on values of df2.index that you are supply, and find them in the index of df1.

The values 0,3,4 are not in the index of df1, so they are marked as nan (and since they are specified twice, you get nan for each of them twice). The values 1 and 2 are matched and you get the matching values each time they match (and you get multiple values for each match).

In [13]: df1.ix[df2.index]
Out[13]: 
    0
0 NaN
1   0
1   2
1   4
1   6
1   8
2   1
2   3
2   5
2   7
2   9
3 NaN
4 NaN
0 NaN
1   0
1   2
1   4
1   6
1   8
2   1
2   3
2   5
2   7
2   9
3 NaN
4 NaN

[26 rows x 1 columns]

You are probably looking for this, a positional indexing. Where the values you are supplying are the locations of the results (and don't care about the labels). This works in 0.12 and 0.13 FYI.

In [14]: df1.iloc[df2.index]
Out[14]: 
   0
1  0
2  1
1  2
2  3
1  4
1  0
2  1
1  2
2  3
1  4

[10 rows x 1 columns]

Duplicate-duplicate indexing is quite tricky. If you have an alternative solution, that provides certain properties (e.g. the order of the indexers must be preserved in the output and you need to have a guaranteed matching for all duplicates), would love to hear it.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't want iloc I was specifically testing the behavior of duplicate-duplicate indexing. I was expecting the behavior in your first example or an exception. I'm happy to find out it's a known bug. Thanks for the answer. –  JaminSore Dec 27 '13 at 18:34

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