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I've been reading up on x64 assembly and I've found a lot of programs that use r11 (and a bunch of other rNumber variables) a lot however I haven't been able to find anything that says what these are and what pupose they server.

Eg:

mov r11, rax

It doesn't appear to be defined anywhere so I'm guessing that they're keywords. None of the tutorials (and no amount of googling turns up anything even close to related) that I've read up on mention this (maybe I've been reading the wrong ones).

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a quick google search about x86_64 should help much faster –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 28 '13 at 1:18
    
I did but I couldn't find much. Plus people here are very helpful. And I'll probably learn more asking something here than just finding some document that will probably bring up even more qiestions. (Also this question took 15 minutes to get a good reply) I just want to make it clear that I don't post here to get out of doing reaserch. –  Lucas S Dec 29 '13 at 2:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

r11 (and the other "r#" sequences) are part of the new register package available in x64.

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Can I assume they're all 64 bit? –  Lucas S Dec 27 '13 at 20:53
    
Yes, they are all 64-bit wide. –  Brian Knoblauch Dec 27 '13 at 20:56
    
+1 I was not aware of this! Can you provide some resources about these new registers? –  BlackBear Dec 27 '13 at 20:57
    
Yes, you can assume that. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64 –  deviantfan Dec 27 '13 at 20:58
1  
R11,R11d,R11w,R11b is like RAX,EAX,AX,AL (there is nothing like AH for R11). The authoritative resource: intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/manuals/… (Chapter 3.4.1.1). Also helpful: x86-64.org/documentation/assembly.html –  m3tikn0b Dec 28 '13 at 15:23

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