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I have this Hashmap of floats and I want to get the top 5 largest values from it:

import java.util.Map;


HashMap<Float,Float> hm = new HashMap<Float,Float>();

// Putting key-value pairs in the HashMap
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {

  float pos = random(-50, 50);
  float time = random(0, 50);
hm.put(time, pos);

}
// Using an enhanced loop to interate over each entry
for (Map.Entry me : hm.entrySet()) {
  print("key is " + me.getKey());
  println(" value is " + me.getValue());
}

I assume I would need to sort it first. Question is, how to sort it and will the keys still remain the same after the sort? When I say "same" I mean will the sorted values still have the original key identifier? This is crucial for what I am trying to accomplish.

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1  
And you've googled for sort map by value, right? –  reto Dec 27 '13 at 22:06
    
Instead of setting keys/values you can set values/key into a TreeMap. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 27 '13 at 22:09
1  
Yes, all keys will point to related values. –  solvator Dec 27 '13 at 22:14
    
@reto of course –  NASA Intern Dec 27 '13 at 22:17
    
@PeterLawrey Why and how would that be a good idea? –  NASA Intern Dec 27 '13 at 22:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code does what you do. I developed and tested it in Processing IDE.

import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.LinkedHashMap;
import java.util.List;

class FloatEntryComparator implements Comparator<Map.Entry> {
  public int compare(Map.Entry e1, Map.Entry e2) {
    return ((Float)e2.getValue()).intValue() - ((Float)e1.getValue()).intValue();
  }
}

void setup() {
  Map<Float,Float> hm = new HashMap<Float,Float>();

  // Putting key-value pairs in the HashMap
  for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    float pos = random(-50, 50);
    float time = random(0, 50);
    hm.put(time, pos);
  }

  println("ALL ENTRIES, UNSORTED:");  
  for (Map.Entry me : hm.entrySet()) {
    print("key is " + me.getKey());
    println(" value is " + me.getValue());
  }

  List<Map.Entry> entries = new ArrayList<Map.Entry>(hm.entrySet());

  java.util.Collections.sort(entries, new FloatEntryComparator());

  hm = new LinkedHashMap<Float, Float>();
  for(Map.Entry e : entries)
    hm.put((Float)e.getKey(), (Float)e.getValue());

  println("5 LARGEST ENTRIES:");  
  int shownCount = 0;
  for (Map.Entry me : hm.entrySet()) {
    if(shownCount == 5)
      break;
    print("key is " + me.getKey());
    println(" value is " + me.getValue());
    ++shownCount;
  }
}

Explanation:

class FloatEntryComparator implements Comparator<Map.Entry> { ... }

~ here we declare so-called comparator, a class used for sorting a list in a specific order.

void setup() { ... }

~ if I understand it right, this is one of entry points for Processing script. Since we are not drawing anything, we don't implement draw function (yet), only setup.

Map<Float,Float> hm = new HashMap<Float,Float>();
for(...) ...

~ this is initialization part, same as in your code.

List<Map.Entry> entries = new ArrayList<Map.Entry>(hm.entrySet());

~ here hashmap is converted to a list of entries

java.util.Collections.sort(entries, new FloatEntryComparator());

~ here list of entries is sorted by values in descending order

hm = new LinkedHashMap<Float, Float>();
for(Map.Entry e : entries)
  hm.put((Float)e.getKey(), (Float)e.getValue());

~ here list of entries is converted to hashmap. The resulting hashmap is sorted by values in descending order.

Here is the complete Processing script, tested against Processing 2.1:

https://gist.github.com/akhikhl/8258430

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This is somewhat confusing but it looks useful! This groovy script wont run in Processing though right now. Ive never used it but it looks similar to Processing. Will I need to adjust it somehow to get it to run? –  NASA Intern Jan 4 '14 at 15:42
    
1) what is Processing? 2) what did you try to make script running and how it did not work? 3) do you know how to start groovyConsole and run scripts with it? –  akhikhl Jan 4 '14 at 15:51
    
The original code I posted is in Processing processing.org. I've never used/heard of groovy script. I am working using the Processing IDE –  NASA Intern Jan 4 '14 at 15:54
    
ok, groovy is not a requirement. what i posted is pure java code. just copy/paste it to your java program, it should work right away. what exactly is confusing? –  akhikhl Jan 4 '14 at 15:56
    
its a bunch of syntax errors. Processing syntax is not the same as java –  NASA Intern Jan 4 '14 at 16:04

If it is possible, replace HashMap by an implementation of NavigableMap, such as TreeMap. The iteration order of a HashMap is undefined.

With a NavigableMap you can sort it from higher to lower values by means of;

for (Map.Entry me : tm.descendingMap().entrySet() ()) {
  System.out.print("key is " + me.getKey());
  System.out.println(" value is " + me.getValue());
}

It is worth noting that descendingMap() does not actually sort the contents of the map (because the TreeMap is already sorted), but just return a reverse view of the original map.

share|improve this answer
    
So you are saying what I am trying to do is not possible with Hashmap and I need to use TreeMap instead? –  NASA Intern Dec 27 '13 at 22:19
    
Rigth. HashMap does not know about ordering between keys (indeed, keys are not required to be comparable). If you already have an instance of HashMap, you may construct a TreeMap from another map with new TreeMap(hm), but that would require sorting all the key set, which is overkill if you only want the five higher values. Note however that sorting a treemap is O(n.log(n)), while finding the 5 highest values by iterating is O(n). –  Javier Dec 27 '13 at 22:25
    
I see. I need to see if I can use this in Processing –  NASA Intern Dec 27 '13 at 22:31
    
Do you call the TreeMap the same way as hasMap? also, how do you feed data into it? I cant find any documentation for it in Processing –  NASA Intern Jan 4 '14 at 15:39

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