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I have this class:

class Test
{
    private $test = 'ok';

    public function doTest()
    {
        echo $this->test;
    }

    public function __destruct()
    {
        $this->test = 'not ok';
    }
}

and the following test case:

$test = new Test;
$test->__destruct(); // I wish this would throw a Fatal Error or something...
$test->doTest(); // prints "not ok"

What I want to accomplish is to prevent __destruct() from being called manually, so that doTest() will never print "not ok".

I tried setting the destructor's visibility to private, but that just leads to a Fatal Error on object destruction. An option would be to set a flag $this->destructed in the destructor and then throw an Exception in doTest() if this flag is true, but it wouldn't be very efficient to check for this flag every time the method is called.

So, a private destructor is not possible and a flag $this->destructed is ugly. Are there better ways?

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2  
What is the point of this? Why would your code be calling the object's destructor manually? - If that's happening, it seems to me like that would be the thing to fix, not this. –  Atli Dec 27 '13 at 22:56
    
I'm not entirely clear what you are trying to accomplish. If its a flag whether or not the class has been destructed, why would you care? PHP garbage collects the object and calls its __destruct() method when the object loses scope –  Rottingham Dec 27 '13 at 22:57
    
@Atli I want to make sure, no one tries to call __destruct() deliberately. It would break functionality if the object is still alive after its destructor has been called. –  Kontrollfreak Dec 27 '13 at 23:15
    
What are you, some control freak? If someone really wants to call destructor, then it is his/her problem. –  dev-null-dweller Dec 27 '13 at 23:32
2  
Honestly, I think you're over complicating the situation. Manually calling a destructor makes no sense. It should simply be assumed that destroying an object while it's still in use will cause problems. If somebody does it, then that would be a bug in that code. - You can't, and shouldn't, try to make sure nonsense situations like that are impossible. –  Atli Dec 27 '13 at 23:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you don't want the destructor to be called, don't implement it. Instead, use a private delegate to do the shutdown stuff.

Your class:

class Test
{
    private $delegate;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->delegate = new TestDelegate;
    }

    public function doTest()
    {
        echo $this->delegate->test."\n";
    }
}

Delegate:

class TestDelegate
{
    public $test = 'ok';

    public function __destruct()
    {
        $this->test = 'not ok';
        echo __METHOD__." called\n";
    }
}

Test:

$test = new Test;
//$test->__destruct(); // fatal error
$test->doTest(); // prints "ok"
// TestDelegate::__destruct() gets called automatically

Now, this may introduce other problems. How to make sure the delegate gets registered if a child class implements a constructor and forgets to call its parent constructor? And wouldn't it break things if the constructor gets called multiple times?

To deal with that, make the constructor final and private and use a factory method:

public static function create()
{
    return new static;
}
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