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In the following code:

function Base() {
    this.colors = ["red", "green", "blue"];
}

var base = new Base();

var derived1 = Object.create(base);
console.log(derived1.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

var derived2 = Object.create(base);
console.log(derived2.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

derived1.colors.push("white");
console.log(derived1.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue", "white"] 
console.log(derived2.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue", "white"]

Two objects are derived from Base, derived1 and derived2. We only push an element into derived1.colors, but derived2.colors is also modified. I know this is because they share the same prototype and its property colors is in reference type. However, it's quite common for a base class to have properties in reference types, so it looks quite risky to use inheritace in JavaScript.

My Question is: How to fix this problem about inheritance if we can, in order to make two copies of colors for derived1 and derived2? If not, what are the best practice to avoid it in the real product code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If this is a concerns I recommend not exposing an array directly, but create a selector and mutator (getter and setter) to access and modify the data. This way you can guarantee the integrity and store state at the right level.

function Base() {
    this.colors = function (colors) {
        if (colors === undefined) {
            return this._colors || (this._colors = ["red", "green", "blue"]);
        } else {
            this._colors = colors;
        }
    };
}

var base = new Base();

var derived1 = Object.create(base);
console.log(derived1.colors()); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

var derived2 = Object.create(base);
console.log(derived2.colors()); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

derived1.colors().push("white");
console.log(derived1.colors()); // ["red", "green", "blue", "white"] 
console.log(derived2.colors()); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

The biggest change is that you have to call colors as a function. See JSFiddle for a demo.

Alternatively you can you use actual getters and setters if you know you're not supporting older JS runtimes.

 function Base() {}

 Base.prototype = {
     get colors() {
         return this._colors || (this._colors = ["red", "green", "blue"]);
     },
     set colors(val) {
         this._colors = val;
     }
 };

The following JSFiddle shows getters and setters in action.

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You are doing var base = new Base(); and setting it as prototype for both the objects (derived1 and derived2). And in javascript they are set as reference which means you make modification on one of them the other references will get the same changes.

So by doing :

derived1.colors.push("white");

You are pushing the value to the property of prototype object (reference) that is same on both the object. Hence you see this behavior since both the object's prototype points to the same object you created earlier.

You can simply do:

var derived1 = Object.create(new Base());
console.log(derived1.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue"]

var derived2 = Object.create(new Base());
console.log(derived2.colors); // ["red", "green", "blue"]
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