Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not sure how I should be approaching this. I have a list of CSS files that I want to feed into something and get HTML back. For example,

(list "base.css" "index.css" "more_css.css") ;vector might be more appropriate?

should be transformed into:

<link href="css/base.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="css/index.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="css/more_css.css" rel="stylesheet" />

From there it should be appended into <head>.

defsnippet almost looks appropriate but takes a template file and a selector for a section of that file. The generated HTML here is not dependent on a template and something that only generates the HTML seems appropriate. clone-for might do the looping part of what I want but I'm having trouble figuring out how to use it.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

defsnippet actually takes any source that Enlive can understand, it doesn't need to be a file. In particular, it can be an inline Enlive-style representation of the link tag template. Since version 1.1.0, Enlive also provides a helper (net.grand.enlive-html/html) that parses Hiccup style notation; I find Hiccup style to be more convenient to write by hand, so that's what I'll use below. (You can also use inline HTML strings by wrapping them in a StringReader: (java.io.StringReader. "<div></div>").)

Here's the code:

(require '[net.cgrand.enlive-html :as enlive])

(enlive/defsnippet link-css
  ;; representation of the link tag template:
  (enlive/html [:link {:href "" :rel "stylesheet"}])
  ;; selector is required, :link works fine here:
  [:link]
  ;; this is the parameter vector of the fn defsnippet will generate:
  [hrefs]
  ;; clone-for will generate one link tag for each provided href:
  (enlive/clone-for [href hrefs]
    [:link]
    (enlive/set-attr :href href)))

You'd use it like so:

(->> (link-css ["css/base.css" "css/index.css" "css/more_css.css"])
  (enlive/emit*)
  (apply str))
;= "<link href=\"css/base.css\" rel=\"stylesheet\" /><link href=\"css/index.css\" rel=\"stylesheet\" /><link href=\"css/more_css.css\" rel=\"stylesheet\" />"

Adding println to the end of the ->> pipeline is a convenient way to test this; here's the output (with the two newlines inserted by hand for clarity):

<link href="css/base.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="css/index.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="css/more_css.css" rel="stylesheet" />
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alternatively:

(require '[net.cgrand.enlive-html :as enlive])

(defn include-css [href]
      (first (enlive/html [:link {:href href :rel "stylesheet"}])))

(map include-css ["css/base.css" "css/index.css" "css/more_css.css"])
;; newlines added by hand for clarity
=> ({:tag :link, :attrs {:href "css/base.css", :rel "stylesheet"}, :content ()} 
    {:tag :link, :attrs {:href "css/index.css", :rel "stylesheet"}, :content ()} 
    {:tag :link, :attrs {:href "css/more_css.css", :rel "stylesheet"}, :content ()})

Double-check it produces the correct HTML:

(print (apply str (html/emit* (map include-css ["css/base.css" "css/index.css" "css/more_css.css"]))))
;; newlines added by hand for clarity
=> <link href="css/base.css" rel="stylesheet" />
   <link href="css/index.css" rel="stylesheet" />
   <link href="css/more_css.css" rel="stylesheet" />
   nil
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.